Archive for June 2012

Monthly Archive

Cancer Patient Raps “Look At Me Now” in Music Video

They say that humor can be great medicine and this rings true for 18-year-old Abigale Hamlin, a leukemia patient being treated in Seattle Children’s Hospital’s Adolescent and Young Adult Oncology Program. Abigale says that a good dose of laughter in her situation helps her to see and think of things in a different light.

Last year, when she first heard Chris Brown’s song featuring Lil Wayne and Busta Rhymes, “Look At Me Now,” her witty and creative nature took hold and her inner rapper emerged as she flowed to the beats with her own lyrics that described what she was going through, “Look at me now, look at me now, I’m losin’ hair-air, or I’m gettin’ che-mo.”

“I’m the kind of person who sings a song and puts my own words to it because I think it is funny,” says Abigale. “Then I thought, how funny would it be if I took the lyrics and made this song cool and funny in my own way!” Read full post »

New Funding Allows Seattle Children’s Science Adventure Lab to Expand

Seattle Children's Science Adventure Lab exteriorGood news today:  Seattle Children’s Research Institute’s Science Adventure Lab, the first mobile science lab program in the Pacific Northwest, announced they will receive  a $1.1 million grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH). The mobile lab travels to urban and rural schools throughout Washington state to bring science education to students in 4th through 8th grades at no cost to schools, teachers, or parents. The additional funding will allow the lab to expand to include structured activities for families with the intent of sparking interest in science-related careers.

That’s timely news given that Seattle recently placed first on a list of U.S. cities for having the highest number of STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics) jobs, according to a Forbes/Praxis Strategy Group study released last month. The report states that the growth of STEM jobs in Seattle has surpassed that of Silicon Valley. Read full post »

Bullying: Identify It and Help Stop It

A video of a 68-year old New York bus monitor being bullied by middle schoolers surfaced yesterday – bringing the unsettling topic of bullying top of mind.

Bullying can be one of the toughest situations a child or adult can face – and can arise in many forms from verbal to physical to emotional. It can manifest in a variety of ways including via the Internet (i.e. cyberbullying) and by spreading rumors. The aftermath of bullying can last a lifetime, providing a sense of hurt, isolation and fear.

According to the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, as many as half of all children are bullied at some time during their school years, and at least 10% are bullied regularly. Read full post »

New Study Clarifies Risks for SIDS

The rate of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) has dropped dramatically (more than 50%) since the 1994 Back-to-Sleep Campaign launched, advising caregivers to place infants on their backs to sleep. However, SIDS remains the leading cause of death among infants  1-12 months old in the U.S. In a study recently published in Pediatrics, researchers identified the risk factors of 568 SIDS deaths from 1991 to 2008, providing insights into the underlying mechanisms of this tragic syndrome. In this videoSeattle Mama Doc, Dr. Wendy Sue Swanson, summarizes the key findings of this study and offers tips to parents and caregivers on how to reduce the risk of SIDS .

 

If you’d like to arrange an interview with Dr. Wendy Sue Swanson,  please contact Children’s PR team at 206-987-4500 or press@seattlechildrens.org.


New Study Highlights Need for Medical Interpreters

Study: Doctors’ Language Tests Spotlight Need to Provide Interpreters in Medical Settings

Issue

The U.S. population is becoming increasingly diverse. According to the U.S. Census Bureau’s American Community Survey Reports, in 2006, 13.7% of U.S. children under age 5 lived in a home where a parent or guardian spoke English less than “very well”. In medical settings, where effective communication between provider and patient is essential to quality care, language barriers have a negative impact. Research has shown that language barriers affect patient satisfaction and compliance, cost, medical errors, and risk of litigation.

While many doctors in the U.S. have some ability to communicate in a foreign language, there are no standards that determine what degree of proficiency is required to communicate effectively with patients. Often, doctors are left to determine themselves whether they’re up to the task of discussing complex medical information in a foreign language. They may not be the best judges of their own abilities. Read full post »

Study: Teens and Young Adults with Mental Health Disorders at Risk of Long-Term Opioid Use

Issue

In a new study, Laura Richardson, MD of Seattle Children’s Research Institute and co-investigators found that young adults ages 13 to 24 with mental health disorders were more likely to be prescribed opioids such as OxyContin and Vicodin for chronic pain and also more than twice as likely to become long-term opioid users than those who didn’t have a mental health disorder. The study, “Mental Health Disorders and Long-term Opioid Use Among Adolescents and Young Adults With Chronic Pain,” appears in the June 2012 issue of  Journal of Adolescent Health, and underscores the increase in the use and abuse of long-term opioid painkillers among teens in the U.S.

In this video, Dr. Richardson discusses the findings of the study and what they tell us about this trend:


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U.S. News & World Report Ranks Seattle Children’s Hospital 6th among Nation’s Children’s Hospitals

Today, U.S. News & World Report ranked Seattle Children’s Hospital among the nation’s top children’s hospitals for the 20th consecutive year. Children’s ranked 6th in this year’s honor roll, moving up from 7th place last year – the hospital’s highest ranking yet. Children’s was also 4th in the country for its nephrology program, 5th for urology, 7th for cancer and 8th for neurology/neurosurgery.

Other Children’s programs receiving top recognition by U.S. News included cardiology/heart surgery, pulmonary, orthopedics, neonatology, gastroenterology and diabetes/endocrinology.

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