Doctors Double the Length of Anna’s Arms, Giving Her Independence

Lisa went into labor expecting her daughter wouldn’t survive.

Lisa Booth was 40 weeks and 6 days into what had been a completely normal pregnancy when she received unexpected news during an ultrasound.

“Everything was fine at 9 a.m. At noon, I was told my daughter would be a dwarf. By 4 p.m., I was told she wasn’t going to survive,” said Booth. “I went home in a completely shell-shocked state.”

Hours later, Booth went into labor expecting the worst.

“Going into labor I was thinking she wouldn’t survive,” she said. Read full post »

Agatha Comes One Step Closer to Her Dream Come True

Agatha and her brother order ice cream at their favorite ice cream shop, Scoop Du Jour.

Nearly half a mile away from 10-year-old Agatha Holloway’s home is a quaint family owned ice cream shop called Scoop Du Jour. It’s her favorite ice cream shop, and she’s always dreamed of being able to walk there. But until recently, that journey was physically too far for her to walk.

Agatha’s declining mobility made walking long distances impossible, but today, thanks to Seattle Children’s Orthopedics and Rehabilitation Medicine teams, Agatha’s dream has come true. Read full post »

A Unique Heart, an Unlikely Friendship, an Inspiration for Others

Luke Smith was born with only one functional ventricle.

For many, Valentine’s Day is a day to celebrate love. For Jesse Smith, the day holds a different meaning. You can usually find her running a race, or sharing her family’s story to raise awareness for a cause that’s near and dear to her heart – her son’s heart.

Smith was shocked the first time she heard one in 110 babies are born with a heart defect. She didn’t know of anyone who had a child with a heart defect, until she was carrying a child with one. The day Smith and her husband were told they were having a baby boy, they also found out there was something wrong with his heart.

“It was devastating, especially because we truly thought we were simply finding out the baby’s sex that day. It was one of those moments that change you forever,” said Smith. Read full post »

Asher Pens a Letter of Gratitude to the Doctor Who Cared for Him and His Dad

Asher was born with Robin sequence, which causes a smaller lower jaw and the tongue to be placed further back than normal. These features tend to block the baby’s airway.

The same day Kirstin and Chris King found out they were having a baby boy, they also received some unexpected news.

“We weren’t anticipating anything out of the usual,” said Kirstin. “But the look on the doctor’s face told us something was wrong.”

The ultrasound images revealed their son’s jaw was visibly stunted, which left the family with more questions than answers.

“I remember going home and thinking, ‘What just happened?’” said Kirstin.

Kirstin described the experience as a whirlwind. Read full post »

Helping Kids With Cleft Lip and Palate Thrive

Cleft lip and palate is the most common condition Seattle Children’s Craniofacial Center treats.

Finding out your child will be born with a cleft lip and palate can be unexpected and distressing for many families. Plagued with questions, parents may wonder if their child will be able to thrive, have speech issues, or what their smile will look like. Dr. Craig Birgfeld, a craniofacial plastic surgeon at Seattle Children’s, enjoys being able to ease a family’s anxiety. At Seattle Children’s, he knows these families are in good hands.

“When patients come to see us they become part of our family,” said Birgfeld. “To me, the best part of our job is seeing these kids grow up and be completely normal kids. It’s hard to remember them as a baby with a cleft. That’s the true test, and one of the reasons we do what we do.” Read full post »

Ciara and Kelly Rowland Spread Holiday Cheer at Seattle Children’s, Carol With Kids and Deliver Amazon Fires

Photo credit: West2East

Cheerful caroling could be heard through the halls of Seattle Children’s today thanks to two very special guests, Ciara and her friend Kelly Rowland. They surprised patients and families in the inpatient playroom with a holiday concert, accompanied by guitarist Barry Black. But that wasn’t the only surprise they had in store for kids at the hospital. The GRAMMY winners teamed up with Amazon and brought holiday cheer to patients and families in another very big way – with one of the largest Amazon deliveries of the year – a six-foot tall Amazon gift box filled with Amazon Fire HD 7s and Amazon Fire HD 8s for patients at Seattle Children’s.

“Caroling with the kids was the perfect way to brighten up the holidays at the hospital and surprising patients with gifts made it very special,” said Ciara. Read full post »

Ben’s Customized Prosthesis is Out of This World

Ben, 19 months old, shows off his Stormtrooper prosthesis.

With every step 19-month-old Benajmin (Ben) Bronske takes, a legion of Stormtroopers lead his way.

Born into a family of avid Star Wars fans, Ben has become a fan as well. With an infectious smile, while wearing a shirt that says, “I’m a Trooper,” Ben proudly shows off his leg. It was uniquely made just for him – it’s covered in Stormtroopers.

“He’s got a really cool leg and a story to go with it,” said Sarah Bronske, Ben’s mother. Read full post »

Seahawks Visit Seattle Children’s, Spread Cheer to 12s in the Hospital

Nico, 15, got a surprise visit from the Seahawks and Sea Gals.

Today, rounds of a different kind were made. Instead of doctors in white coats, the Seattle Seahawks and members of the Sea Gals, dressed in blue and green, made their way through the hospital to visit patients and families at Seattle Children’s. They couldn’t have picked a better day to bring cheer to 12s in the hospital: Dec. 12 (12/12).

“Today brought us a lot of joy, even if it was just for a minute,” said Alberto Tobias, father of Nico Tobias, a patient at Seattle Children’s. “It was really fun. We were so happy to see the players walk into our room.”

The Captain’s Blitz is an annual tradition that brightens the day for Seahawks fans big and small at Seattle Children’s. Read full post »

Living the Movie Wonder: How 13-Year-Old Nathaniel Found Freedom, Inspires Kindness

Nathaniel Newman and his mother pose for a photo together before Nathaniel undergoes the first in a series of surgeries to allow him to breathe without a tracheostomy for the first time in his life. Watch his incredible journey on ABC 20/20. Photo courtesy of ABC 20/20.

The movie “Wonder,” based on the New York Times bestseller, premiered worldwide today, and although the movie is fictional, the storyline sheds light on a rare craniofacial condition affecting 1 in 50,000 newborns: Treacher Collins syndrome.

“Wonder” weaves together an inspiring tale of kindness, as viewers are transported into the world of August (Auggie) Pullman, an ordinary boy born with an extraordinary face. The story has captured the hearts of millions, but it hits particularly close to home for one Seattle-based family.

Nathaniel Newman, 13, and his family have no trouble relating to the storyline; they live it every day. Nathaniel was born with Treacher Collins syndrome and has been called “Auggie Pullman come to life” by author R.J. Palacio.

Nathaniel knows what it’s like to walk in Auggie’s shoes. His message to others is simple. It echoes that of Auggie: Be kind. Read full post »

Erin Celebrates Major Milestones After One Year in Remission

For the first time in her life, 7-year-old Erin Cross was healthy enough to go trick-or-treating.

This Halloween marked a monumental milestone for 7-year-old Erin Cross. For the first time in Erin’s life, she was healthy enough to go trick-or-treating. And her costume of choice – an old woman – held a special meaning for her family.

Two years ago, Erin’s family was facing the devastating reality that they may never see her grow up. But today, she’s in remission thanks to a groundbreaking immunotherapy clinical trial at Seattle Children’s. Her family finally has the chance to envision her long life ahead, a life filled with normal things, like trick-or-treating and playing with other kids.

“Erin has been so incredibly brave,” said her mother, Sarah Cross. “For us, normal was being in the hospital. Today, she’s cancer-free and getting back to normal life.” Read full post »