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From Transplant Patient to Aspiring Transplant Surgeon

Wade Washington underwent a kidney transplant at Seattle Children’s in 2013 and is now a student at the University of Washington with career aspirations of working in healthcare.

Growing up, 19-year-old Wade Washington knew he’d one day need a kidney transplant. The question was never if, but when.

“I never really knew what normal was,” said Washington. “I was born with chronic kidney disease, and so it was what I was used to.”

As a child, Washington’s condition was manageable, but as he grew up his condition worsened. As Washington hit puberty, his kidneys began to fail.

“Wade was born with renal dysplasia, a congenital malformation of his kidneys,” said Dr. Andre Dick, surgical director of the Kidney Transplant Program at Seattle Children’s. “Once he entered puberty, his kidneys couldn’t meet his body’s metabolic demand. We knew he’d need a transplant.” Read full post »

A Life-Saving Transplant Inspires One Family to Give Back

Elliott Kaczmarek, 3, poses with his mother, Nicole, and father, Jonathan.

This April, in recognition of Donate Life Month, On the Pulse shares the story of how a life-altering diagnosis put one family on a philanthropic journey to help others in need.

When Elliott Kaczmarek was 10 months old he came down with what his parents thought was a stomach bug.

“He wasn’t feeling well, but we didn’t think much of it at first,” said Jonathan Kaczmarek, Elliott’s father.

Just in case, the Kaczmarek’s called Elliott’s pediatrician. Initially, there was no cause for alarm. He had a mild fever and threw up a few times, and so their biggest worry at the time was dehydration.

“After a few days he started getting better,” said Nicole Kaczmarek. “Then his condition changed. He turned green and pale and was lethargic. It was then we knew he needed to go the urgent care.” Read full post »

Grateful for the Family Who Saved Her Son, One Mother Reflects on Organ Donation

A year ago, On the Pulse shared the harrowing story of 8-month-old Lincoln Seay. Lincoln was born with heterotaxy syndrome, a severe birth defect that caused his heart to develop on the opposite side of his body. In order to survive, he needed a heart transplant.

In November of last year, Lincoln was placed on the transplant list, but as each day passed, his condition continued to worsen and doctors questioned if he would make it to transplant.

“We had a list of patients and he was the one we were most concerned about,” said Dr. Michael McMullan, surgical director of heart transplantation at Seattle Children’s. Read full post »

It’s a Messy Topic, but Let’s Talk About Poop

There are a lot of ways to describe it: soft, hard, brown, green, runny and stinky. It’s a messy topic often discussed behind closed doors, but today, we’re breaking down what you need to know about poop – from its color, consistency and frequency, to what to do when a child is backed up.

According to Dr. Mollie Grow, a pediatrician at Seattle Children’s and the University of Washington, it can be challenging for some families to be open about the body’s natural process of elimination. In other words, it can be hard to talk about poop. There’s often embarrassment talking about the subject when there shouldn’t be.

“As pediatricians, we get really comfortable talking about poop,” said Grow. “We try to normalize the conversation with patients and families.” Read full post »

Kenley Snowboards With Prosthetics, Proves if There Is a Will There Is a Way

Kenley Teller, 6, snowboards with two prosthetic legs.

Watch 6-year-old Kenley Teller snowboard down a slope and you’ll notice two things right away: a big smile on her face and her fiery red hair billowing in the wind beneath her helmet. What is not apparent are her two prosthetic legs.

“She’s free when she snowboards,” said Kenley’s mother, Mary Teller. “I don’t want to say she feels normal, because how do you define normal anyway? She may need to do things a little different than other people, but she can still do them. I’m constantly in awe of her.” Read full post »

The Unsung Heroes of the Sidelines

Tara Peerenboom is one of 35 licensed athletic trainers in the Seattle Children’s Athletic Trainers Program.

They are a constant presence on the sidelines of sporting events, but they don’t adorn a jersey or get a trophy at the end of a season. We see them as they spring into action when an athlete suffers an injury. They run onto the field or court and quickly access and care for an athlete writhing in pain, but their time in the limelight is short lived, at least from what we see from the stands.

What you don’t see are the hours athletic trainers spend before, during and after games preparing, rehabilitating or counseling athletes and coaches. And so, in recognition of Athletic Training Month, On the Pulse shadowed Tara Peerenboom, an athletic trainer at Seattle Children’s, to get a behind the scenes look at her role both on and off the field.

“People see us on the sidelines and think of us as the individuals who give water to athletes,” said Peerenboom. “They don’t see the time we spend in the athletic training room before, after and during a game or practice. We’re not just medical providers. Our athletes trust us, and we’re there for them during difficult times. Taping and getting ready for games is a small part of our work.” Read full post »

Care Team’s Casting Creativity Brings Joy to Patients

Maggie Burke, 9, aspires to be an Olympic gymnast.

When 9-year-old Maggie Burke broke her elbow after an unusual landing while vaulting at gymnastics practice, she was concerned her dream may be in jeopardy.

She’s a competitive gymnast with a dream to compete in the 2024 Olympics, and so when she found out her injury would require surgery and a cast, she was feeling anxious. She never needed surgery before and her emergency trip to Seattle Children’s was the Burke family’s first trip to the hospital.

“During surgery prep, the staff found out about Maggie’s passion for gymnastics and her dream,” said Maggie’s mother, Odilia Burke. “We felt greatly supported by kind, caring and knowledgeable people that would soon have our daughter in their hands of expertise. What we weren’t expecting was the surprise we received when Maggie came out of recovery.”

In the operating room, while doctors expertly cared for Maggie’s elbow and set her arm in a cast, a surgical technologist went to work designing something special just for Maggie. It was a small gesture, but just what the doctor ordered. Read full post »

Diagnosing Celiac Disease: Is It a Stomach Ache or Something More?

Today, Kyla Greenstein is an active 13-year-old girl who loves to skiing, among other sports.

From the time Kyla Greenstein was born, something wasn’t quite right with her digestion system. Kyla suffered from chronic diarrhea and bloating, and although she seemed to be an otherwise healthy child, it was concerning for her parents. It wasn’t until a well child check at the age of 5 when the family learned about an unexpected theory for their daughter’s tummy woes.

“On a day-to-day basis she was a happy child,” said Cindy Greenstein, Kyla’s mother. “But occasionally she would bloat and her stomach would be painful to the touch. We knew something was going on, just not what exactly.”

Her doctor recommended she be checked for celiac disease, and so the family was referred to Seattle Children’s where the diagnosis was confirmed.

Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder. When someone with celiac disease eats gluten, a protein found in wheat and rye, it causes an immune system reaction and stimulates the body to attack the small intestine.

“Celiac is really common, occurring in about 1 in 100 people,” said Dr. Dale Lee, a gastroenterologist at Seattle Children’s and director of Seattle Children’s Celiac Disease Program. “It’s tricky because the presentation of celiac can be different for everyone. The symptoms of celiac can be quite variable, and so many people go undiagnosed.” Read full post »

Small Innovation Helps Train the Next Generation of African Cleft Surgeons

Cleft lip and cleft palate occur when part of the lip or roof of the mouth (palate) does not form properly.

When Dr. Richard Hopper, surgical director of Seattle Children’s Craniofacial Center, and his team of experts identify a problem, they won’t stop thinking about ways to solve it. Such was the case when they invented a device to help teach doctors in Africa how to perform cleft lip and palate surgery.

Cleft lip and cleft palate are birth defects that occur when part of a child’s lip or roof of the mouth don’t form properly, leaving a gap, or cleft. Cleft lip and palate are some of the most common birth defects in the U.S., occurring in about one in 4,000 babies. In Africa, the statistics are similar; however, the lack of medical care and shortage of surgeons to repair the birth defects can cause a cascade of problems for newborns, including malnutrition, social isolation and premature death.

Solving a problem through innovation

“When I visited Ghana for the first time, we found one of the greatest needs was in engaging and training more African doctors to perform the cleft lip and palate surgery,” said Hopper. “It’s a very technical surgery and you need a lot of education before you can do it safely.” Read full post »

Dr. Ben Danielson Honored for an Innovative Approach to Caring for Children

Danielson was recognized by the Simms/Mann Institute as a recipient of the 2017 Whole Child Award.

Today, Dr. Ben Danielson, senior medical director of Seattle Children’s Odessa Brown Children’s Clinic (OBCC), was honored by the Simms/Mann Institute as a recipient of the Whole Child Award, a national recognition that honors extraordinary leaders in medicine and education. Launched in 2015, the Whole Child Award is given to individuals who are focused on a whole child approach to caring for children and their families.

On the Pulse sat down with Danielson to talk about this achievement and how OBCC, a community clinic located in Seattle’s Central District that provides medical, dental, mental health and nutrition services to families, approaches caring for the whole child. Read full post »