Gastroenterology

All Articles in the Category ‘Gastroenterology’

Ciara Helps Pamper Patients at Seattle Children’s

Lynch posed for a photo with Ciara after getting a makeover. Photo credit: Corky Trewin

Today, patients at Seattle Children’s were pampered thanks to Ciara, who along with her glam squad, surprised children at the hospital with complimentary makeovers.

“Every time I visit Seattle Children’s, I see how strong these children are who are going through such difficult battles,” said Ciara. “I wanted to help make them feel as strong and beautiful as they are to me, and to let them know I’m thinking about them. I often hear that I inspire these kids, but they’re really the ones that inspire me. They are the real superheroes of today.”

Ciara, who often visits Seattle Children’s with her husband, Seahawk’s quarterback Russell Wilson, wanted to organize an event to help make kids at the hospital feel beautiful – both inside and out. And so, for the day, Seattle Children’s was transformed into a beauty salon for “Ciara’s Makeover Monday by Revlon.” Read full post »

Novel Diet Therapy Helps Children With Crohn’s Disease and Ulcerative Colitis Reach Remission

dr-suskind

Lead researcher, Dr. David Suskind, a pediatric gastroenterologist at Seattle Children’s.

Can diet alone be used to treat Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis (UC)? It’s a question Dr. David Suskind, a gastroenterologist at Seattle Children’s, has been researching for years.

Today, he finally has the answer: yes.

In a first-of-its-kind-study led by Suskind, published today in the Journal of Clinical Gastroenterology, diet alone was shown to bring pediatric patients with active Crohn’s and UC into clinical remission.

“This changes the paradigm for how we may choose to treat children with inflammatory bowel disease,” said Suskind. Read full post »

Amazon Makes Special Deliveries to Seattle Children’s

Gio Caro, 6, helped bring holiday cheer to patients at Seattle Children’s.

The holidays arrived early this year for families at Seattle Children’s and Odessa Brown Children’s Clinic (OBCC). Amazon brightened the day for patients and families by making one of their largest – and most special – deliveries of the year.

“We so appreciate the important work Seattle Children’s and Odessa Brown does for families in our Seattle community,” said Sam Kennedy, an Amazon spokesperson. “We are proud to give back to such amazing organizations and to put a smile on people’s faces during this special time of year.”

The hospital was filled with excitement as patients and families gathered around a giant Amazon gift box in the inpatient playroom at the hospital. Giomoni (Gio) Caro, 6, a long-time patient at Seattle Children’s, was given the honor of unveiling what was inside the box – a brand new Kindle For Kids Bundle with the latest E-reader for every child in the hospital and a $50 gift card for families in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) – and was designated as an “Elf for a Day” to help spread holiday cheer throughout the hospital. Read full post »

Let’s Talk About What Most People Avoid: Poop

Poop Emoji Pose

Dr. Ambartsumyan poses with items from her wall of memorabilia.

Everyone poops. Now that that’s out of the way, let’s talk about it.

Dr. Lusine Ambartsumyan, director of Seattle Children’s Gastrointestinal Motility program, is on a mission to open up a dialogue about poop.

According to Ambartsumyan, people tend to shy away from conversations related to bowel movements. She says many people feel uncomfortable or shameful talking about it, but these are vital conversations for parents and children to have together.

Millions of children around the world have problems with constipation and fecal incontinence, or the ability to control bowel movements. However, these issues can be difficult to diagnose if children and parents aren’t willing to speak up.

“There’s a stigma, and sometimes parents don’t know their child is suffering from constipation or incontinence because they feel ashamed to talk about it,” said Ambartsumyan. “We have to desensitize and demystify shame around poop. I talk about poop all day long, every single day, and I love talking about it. I want people to feel comfortable talking about it too because it’s critical for their health.” Read full post »

New Year, Fresh Start For a Little Girl With a Song of Her Own

Gabby and KimMilestones deserve a celebration. At least that’s what Seattle Children’s Pediatric Advanced Care Team thought when 9-year-old Gabby Krueger, a longtime patient at Seattle Children’s, received some good news the week before Christmas. After 14 weeks in the hospital, doctors gave the family the green light to go home.

“We’ve been here a really long time,” said Kim Sistek, Gabby’s mother. “We were really excited to go home.”

The news came after Gabby showed improvement in motility. For three years, Gabby has needed assistance going to the bathroom. She’s needed to use enemas to pass stool on her own. Her parents were beginning to have conversations with doctors about what Gabby’s life would look like if she lost motility. Her outcome was looking bleak. But just a couple weeks ago, Gabby made an improvement. Read full post »

Alternative to Steroids and Medication, Novel Diet Helps Teen Overcome Crohn’s

Avi Beach

Avi Shapiro, 15, on a beach in New York, weeks after starting novel diet.

When Avi Shapiro, 15, began complaining of an ache in his stomach, the last thing his mother thought could be the cause was a chronic disease. But after several trips to the doctor, that’s exactly the diagnosis they received.

“I thought the tummy ache would go away, or that maybe he was lactose intolerant,” said Ingrid Elliott, Avi’s mother. “My next thought was, ‘If it’s anything, I hope it’s celiac disease.’ I know how to deal with that. I am gluten intolerant so I know it’s something we could treat with diet.”

After multiple visits to see their pediatrician and a trip to Seattle Children’s for an endoscopy and a colonoscopy, the results were confirmed. Shapiro’s intestines were severely inflamed. He was diagnosed with Crohn’s disease, a form of Inflammatory Bowl Disease (IBD). Read full post »

Clinical Trial Offers Only Treatment Option for Girl with Hepatitis B

Esmee and Willa

Esmee (left) and Willa (right) pose for a photo.

A clinical trial was the only hope for Esmee, a little girl adopted from China. Read below about her story and the innovative research being done at Seattle Children’s Hospital and Research Institute to help those who would otherwise have no treatment option for chronic hepatitis B (HBV).

Renee Jones always wanted a little girl, so when the adoption agency called one day to tell Jones about Esmee and Willa, she was thrilled – two little girls instead of one!

She filed the paperwork for adoption and waited patiently to hear back. Read full post »

Teen Offers Hope to Others Living with Crohn’s Disease

Lizzy Hiking

Elizabeth doesn’t let Crohn’s slow her down, enjoys hiking.

Elizabeth McIntosh, 19, has been through a lot to get to where she is today. Diagnosed with Crohn’s disease, one of the most common types of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), at age 2, she felt like she was never going to be able to have a normal life – one uninterrupted by Crohn’s flare ups and debilitating abdominal pain.

But after undergoing surgery to remove more than three feet of her colon, she’s finally living the life she’s always hoped to live and wants to offer support to others living with Crohn’s.

“Never lose hope,” said McIntosh, who’s been a patient at Seattle Children’s since diagnosis. “You may have a long journey ahead of you, but you always have to have hope. It will get better.” Read full post »

Fashion Show Helps Children and Teenagers End Ostomy Surgery Stigma

Lizzy

Elizabeth McIntosh, 19

A unique fashion show took place at Seattle Children’s Hospital this weekend during the Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) Conference, presented by the Northwest Chapter of the Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation of America and Seattle Children’s. To help end stigmas around ostomies, eight children and teenagers with inflammatory bowel disease, ages 8 to 20, walked the runway styled head-to-toe in the latest spring fashions by Nordstrom. Four of the children in the fashion show had ostomies, two did not have ostomies, and two of the models have IBD, but do not have an ostomy.

The only question was: did the audience know which models had ostomies and which didn’t?

The answer was a resounding “No.” Read full post »

Study Suggests Fecal Transplant Could Be Effective Treatment for Crohn’s Disease

Dr. David Suskind, an investigator in Seattle Children’s Research Institute’s Center for Clinical and Translational Research and a gastroenterologist at Seattle Children’s Hospital, led a research study treating patients with Crohn's disease using fecal microbiota transplant.

Dr. David Suskind, an investigator in Seattle Children’s Research Institute’s Center for Clinical and Translational Research, led a research study treating patients with Crohn’s disease using fecal microbiota transplant.

Results of the first FDA-approved study treating patients with Crohn’s disease using fecal microbiota transplant (FMT) suggest it could be an effective new treatment.

A recent publication in the journal Inflammatory Bowel Diseases titled, “Fecal Microbial Transplant Effect on Clinical Outcomes and Fecal Microbiome in Active Crohn’s Disease,” reports seven of nine patients with Crohn’s disease were effectively treated using FMT in a Seattle Children’s research study.

“This research could change the way Crohn’s disease is treated and help unravel the mystery of what causes it,” said Dr. David Suskind, the study’s lead investigator, who is a member of Seattle Children’s Research Institute’s Center for Clinical and Translational Research and a gastroenterologist at Seattle Children’s Hospital. Read full post »