Health and Safety

All Articles in the Category ‘Health and Safety’

Fireworks Safety

Approximately 9,300 people are seriously injured because of fireworks each year in our country – and children under the age of 14 incur nearly half of these injuries.

Indeed, if they’re not handled properly, fireworks can cause burns, as well as hand, foot and eye injuries in both children and adults. Bottle rockets are the leading cause of fireworks-related fires. And sparklers burn at over 1,200 degrees; they are one of the main fireworks that cause injuries.

The best way to protect your family is not to use any fireworks at home – attend public fireworks displays, and leave the lighting to the professionals. Read full post »

Bullying: Identify It and Help Stop It

A video of a 68-year old New York bus monitor being bullied by middle schoolers surfaced yesterday – bringing the unsettling topic of bullying top of mind.

Bullying can be one of the toughest situations a child or adult can face – and can arise in many forms from verbal to physical to emotional. It can manifest in a variety of ways including via the Internet (i.e. cyberbullying) and by spreading rumors. The aftermath of bullying can last a lifetime, providing a sense of hurt, isolation and fear.

According to the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, as many as half of all children are bullied at some time during their school years, and at least 10% are bullied regularly. Read full post »

Protecting Children from Harmful Effects of Violence in the News

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Tragic news of multiple fatal shootings rocked Seattle today.

Children can be especially at risk to experience fear and anxiety as reactions to these events. Research shows that children who witness violence  in regular news coverage, as well as in their families, schools and communities, are vulnerable to serious long-term emotional harm.

In the video below, Dr. Bob Hilt, child and adolescent psychiatrist at Seattle Children’s Hospital, discusses ways parents can help their children cope during disasters such as earthquakes,  man-made disasters, and random acts of violence.

Read full post »

Deploying an Automobile Manufacturing Process to Serve Patients Better

On the face of it, lean manufacturing, which is used by Toyota and other major global companies, doesn’t seem to fit very well into the world of medicine.

But, on closer examination, surgeons are beginning to see that lean has a good deal in common with the scientific method used in research – it’s just a matter of terminology, although it’s important to point out that this isn’t like randomized controlled trials; instead, it’s about testing hypotheses.

Indeed, the overall goal of lean is to define and refine a process, and then make the end product better for the customer; in medicine, that’s the patient. Read full post »

Whooping Cough Reaches Epidemic Levels in Washington State

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Pertussis, aka “whooping cough”, has reached epidemic levels in Washington state and elsewhere throughout the country.  Whooping cough, an infection of the respiratory system, spreads from person to person easily and can be life-threatening.  Infants and children who haven’t been immunized can get seriously ill if they get whooping cough.

Public health officials are asking everyone to make sure they’re up-to-date with vaccines. It’s especially important for anyone who has close contact with babies younger than 12 months to get vaccinated to help protect the baby from whooping cough. This includes parents, siblings, grandparents, health care providers, and child care providers.

Experts believe a growing hesitancy toward vaccination in general,  as well as the fact that many adults don’t realize they need to get vaccinated against pertussis have contributed to Washington’s whooping cough epidemic.  Vaccination decreases the chance of contracting and spreading whooping cough. Read full post »

Springtime Drowning Risks in Open Waters

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In the U.S., drowning is the second-leading cause of injury death for children, according to a report from the Centers for Disease Control.  Most drownings occur in lakes and rivers. Children ages 1-4 and 15-19 are at highest risk. Non-fatal drownings are nearly five times higher in number, and can cause long-term disabilities including brain damage, memory problems, learning disabilities or permanent loss of basic functioning.

Why we should be talking about this now

While the weather is warming up, lakes, rivers and streams in the many parts of the country are still extremely cold, and snowpack melt feeds rivers that are running deep, cold and swift.  Sadly, it is at this time of year that drowning deaths often occur as people venture into these waters without appropriate lifesaving gear and lifeguard protection. Preparation, planning and extreme caution in activities around open water are needed to prevent drowning.  Read full post »

Crying Babies Live Facebook Chat

Have you, a family member or friend ever felt like a failed parent when a newborn cried inconsolably despite your best efforts to comfort the child?  It’s a common feeling.  New parents – and even experienced caregivers – can easily feel overwhelmed or frustrated by an infant’s crying. It can be a nerve-wracking experience, and often people think they must be doing something wrong.

There are many misperceptions about babies crying, and well-intended advice from family and friends may be inaccurate, increasing frustration and anxiety. The reality is all infants have extended bouts of crying, and there are effective ways to cope with it. Read full post »

Pinwheels Planting Raises Awareness of Child Abuse Victims

To recognize April as National Child Abuse Prevention Month, Seattle Children’s Hospital will place thousands of pinwheels around the hospital campus this week. Each pinwheel represents a child who has suffered abuse, and people may purchase their own pinwheels at hospital gift shops to place outside. All proceeds will go to Seattle Children’s Protection, Advocacy and Outreach Program. Read full post »

Keeping Teens Healthy and Injury Free During the Spring Sports Season

Sporty teensHigh school spring sports season has arrived. Many school districts like Seattle Public Schools  recently began practices – for baseball, softball, lacrosse, tennis, track and field, and soccer.

As the season begins, it is important to review the ways teens can keep themselves healthy and injury-free as they embark on what should be a carefree and fun experience. Read full post »