Heart Center

All Articles in the Category ‘Heart Center’

Seattle Children’s Aims to Unravel the Mysteries of Kawasaki Disease

Jennifer Bevaart's son William was diagnosed with Kawasaki disease in September, 2014.

Jennifer Bevaart’s son William was diagnosed with Kawasaki disease in September, 2014.

In honor of National Kawasaki Disease Awareness Day, we are sharing the story of William, a 10-year-old boy who lives with the disease, and why Seattle Children’s, an international leader in Kawasaki disease research, is the best place for children like William to receive treatment.

In September, Jennifer Bevaart’s son William developed a fever that lasted for days. He was lethargic, had a rash on his chest and his eyes were bloodshot. Over the next two weeks, Bevaart took William to at least four different specialists, each of whom suggested a different diagnosis: a sinus infection, walking pneumonia, bronchitis, even scarlet fever. Each treatment failed to ease William’s symptoms. He went from an active, tae kwon do enthusiast to a weak boy who was too weak to walk even the short distance to the mailbox without lying down to rest.

“Call it mother’s intuition, but I just knew something was very wrong with my son,” Bevaart said. “I felt like I was watching him die.” Read full post »

Pushing Limits, Saving Lives

As we head into the New Year, we’d like to reflect on some of the incredible clinical advancements of 2014 that show how our doctors have gone the extra mile for our patients.

In the Children’s HealthLink Special video above, watch how futuristic medicine has saved the lives of the littlest patients at Seattle Children’s. From 3D-printed heart models to liquid ventilation, doctors and families reveal the amazing benefits of innovative treatments that challenge the status quo. Read full post »

A Year in Review, Looking Back at the Top Posts of 2014

New YearIn honor of the New Year, we’re taking a look back at some of our most popular and memorable blog posts from 2014. Below is a list of our top 10 posts. Here’s to another great year of health news to come. Happy New Year!

Lung Liquid Similar to One Used in Movie “The Abyss” Saves Infant’s Life, Doctors Encourage FDA Approval of Clinical Trials

Two doctors at Seattle Children’s went the extra mile to save Tatiana, one of the sickest babies they’ve ever seen. They got ‪FDA‬ approval to use a long-forgotten drug and are now inspired to help make this drug available to save more lives.

Visit with Macklemore Helps 6-Year-Old Heart Patient Recover

AJ Hwangbo was a happy-go-lucky 6-year-old without a worry in the world until mid-November when he developed a life-threatening heart condition. While specialists at Seattle Children’s Hospital helped AJ heal physically, the young boy struggled to bounce back emotionally. But, AJ’s joyful spirit returned after hospital staff arranged for him to meet his hero – local artist Macklemore. Read full post »

The Other Side of the Patient Bed: From Pediatrician to Frightened Parent

Dr. Katie Williams, a pediatrician and urgent care specialist at Seattle Children’s Bellevue Clinic and Surgery Center, lived every parent’s worst nightmare when her 1-month-old son turned gravely ill one Saturday evening in January. Here, Williams shares how her infant escaped the grip of death and how she gained a new level of gratitude thanks to her colleagues’ expertise in pediatric life support.

Dr. Katie Williams with her son, Grayson

The Saturday that is forever burned in my memory started out typically. My husband David DeTerra and I took our three kids — 4-year-old Evan and 1-month-old twins Elisabeth and Grayson — to an afternoon birthday party for a friend. On the way home, we stopped for takeout and looked forward to a relaxing evening at home. I remember sitting in the car thinking how glad I was that the twins had reached the 30-day mark, because that’s the point where infants are less likely to get serious infections.

What happened next came totally out of the blue.

Grayson started breathing funny and he had this strange rhythmic cry. I figured he was hungry and wanted out of his car seat to nurse. When we got home, David noticed he felt cool and clammy and his face looked pale. We both tried to feed him, but he wouldn’t eat. His eyes, normally so alert, couldn’t connect with us at all. When his tiny body went limp, we frantically called 9-1-1. Read full post »

Practice Makes Perfect: Improving a Life-Saving Process Through Simulation

The following is part 2 of our two-part series on ECPR, a combination of CPR and ECMO offered at Seattle Children’s Hospital to save the most fragile patients’ lives. Part 1 covered Hannah Mae Campbell’s incredible story where ECPR and a heart transplant saved her life and allowed her to be the thriving toddler she is today. Here, we discuss how Seattle Children’s has spearheaded a first-of-its-kind ECPR simulation program to improve the process that allows the hospital to save patients in a time of crisis.

In an ECPR simulation in Seattle Children's neonatal intensive care unit, the surgeon works to get the mannequin on the ECMO pump.

In an ECPR simulation in Seattle Children’s neonatal intensive care unit, the surgeon works to get the mannequin on the ECMO pump.

ECPR takes place when a patient goes into cardiac arrest, does not respond to CPR and is then put on Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation (ECMO), a machine that functions for the heart and lungs when the organs fail or need to rest. Hannah Mae Campbell’s experience demonstrates the importance of technology like ECMO and why it’s important to continually improve complex, life-saving processes like ECPR.

Since January of this year, Seattle Children’s has executed the largest-scale ECPR simulations in the nation, with medical staff coming together bimonthly to practice as though they were in a real ECPR situation. Even though Seattle Children’s ECPR outcomes are higher than the national average, the hospital initiated the simulations with the goal of standardizing each step of the process to further improve outcomes for patients. Read full post »

From Devastating Heart Diagnosis to Hopefulness and Joy

On Sunday, Briella Caniparoli celebrated her first birthday, a miraculous feat given the struggles she’s had to overcome. This is Briella’s story, from a devastating heart diagnosis before birth to hope for a bright future.

Briella3

Briella with Dr. Agustin Rubio at Seattle Children’s Hospital

Christina Caniparoli and her husband, Mark, came to Christina’s 20-week ultrasound at a local hospital with no expectations except to learn the sex of their second child. Four hours later, the couple left with very different news.

“During the appointment they kept leaving the room and coming back, then leaving again,” Christina Caniparoli said. “Something was definitely not right.”

Doctors told the Caniparolis that their baby had significant heart defects, and most likely had Down’s syndrome. The parents-to-be were presented with the option to terminate the pregnancy.

“It just wasn’t an option for us,” Christina Caniparoli said. “I wasn’t ready to just accept what they were saying, but even if they were right, we would deal with whatever it was.”

Read full post »

From Heartbreak to Hope: Technology and a New Heart Save Hannah’s Life

The following is part 1 of a two-part series on ECPR, a combination of CPR and ECMO offered at Seattle Children’s Hospital to save the most fragile patients’ lives. Here, we tell Hannah Mae Campbell’s story and how ECPR saved her life. In part 2, we’ll discuss how Seattle Children’s has spearheaded a first-of-its-kind ECPR simulation program this year to improve the process that allows the hospital to save patients in a time of crisis.

Today, Sept. 24, marks a remarkable milestone for the Campbell family – the end of a long, tumultuous journey that began the day their daughter, Hannah Mae Campbell, was born. It’s the anniversary of the day Hannah received a new heart, and a chance at life two years ago.

Hannah’s journey begins

When Jennifer Campbell of Everett, Wash., was pregnant with Hannah she prepared as much as she could and followed all the prenatal guidelines to a tee. This was her first baby and she, as all parents do, wanted her little girl to be perfect.

Once Hannah was born on May 18, 2012, Jennifer and her husband Jon remember how the joy of seeing their little girl for the first time quickly turned into terror. Hannah was lethargic, her hands and feet were blue and her heart was rapidly pumping at 253 beats per minute. The room at the local birthing center quickly filled with doctors and then Hannah was taken to the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Twelve hours later, Hannah was transferred by ambulance to Seattle Children’s Hospital.

Read full post »

Mason’s Half-Heart Diagnosis Doesn’t Squash His Independence

Mason Garka, 6, holds a photo of himself as a baby, just before his surgery on July 4, 2008

Independence Day has a unique meaning for Greg and Kelsey Garka. It was on July 4, 2008, that their brand new baby boy, Mason, had his chest closed after the first of three life-saving heart operations at Seattle Children’s Hospital.

“His recovery from that day forward went text book well,” Kelsey Garka said. “It was the first step toward the spunky, independent boy he is today.”

Mason, who just celebrated his sixth birthday, was born with Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome (HLHS), a congenital birth defect that affects the left side of the heart, which pumps oxygen-rich blood to the body.

Read full post »

Seattle Children’s Doctor Featured in Season Premier of “NY Med”

Dr. Jonathan Chen

Dr. Jonathan Chen, division chief of pediatric cardiovascular surgery and co-director of Seattle Children’s Heart Center

Tune in tonight to ABC to see our own Dr. Jonathan Chen featured in the season premier of the popular real-life hospital series, “NY Med,” which airs at 10:00 p.m. The eight-episode documentary series, which took nearly two years to produce, aims to showcase tales of high stakes medicine where renowned surgeons perform feats of medical brilliance.

The premier episode will highlight a case Chen handled during his time at Manhattan’s New York-Presbyterian Hospital, which he practiced at prior to coming to Seattle Children’s Hospital  to assume the role of division chief for pediatric cardiothoracic surgery and co-director of Seattle Children’s Heart Center.

You will be able to watch Chen skillfully treat a 19-year-old Marine who collapsed at boot camp due to a sudden stroke. Chen discovers the Marine’s heart is severely enlarged and he takes him on a journey to recovery that involves a life-saving heart transplant.

To learn more about the show, visit: http://abc.go.com/shows/ny-med

Heart Transplant Doesn’t Stop Micaela from Graduating on Time

Micaela Powell 6-2014Micaela Powell, 18, wasn’t going to let a heart transplant stop her from finishing her senior year at Everett High School and graduating with the rest of the seniors in her class.

“She was begging to go back to her senior year,” said Dr. Erin Albers, attending pediatric cardiologist at Seattle Children’s Hospital.

Micaela’s goal wasn’t going to be easy to achieve…she had more than three months’ worth of missed classes and school work to complete before graduating. But she did it, and this Saturday will wear a navy blue cap and gown.

Read more about Micaela’s journey in the Everett Herald story that ran earlier this week.

 Resources: