Neonatology

All Articles in the Category ‘Neonatology’

Benson’s miraculous journey from micro-preemie to on-the-move toddler

The Borgen familyYears ago I was listening to a radiothon for Seattle Children’s Hospital while driving in my car. I was so moved by the patients’ stories of hope and healing, I had to pull into a parking lot because I was crying so hard. I called the number and made a donation – never dreaming that I would have more than a “goodwill” relationship with the hospital.

Fast forward to 2012.

I heard that same radiothon in the car. My eyes swelled with tears and my throat tightened, this time because my newborn son was one of those patients in a bed at Children’s.

My name is Breanna Borgen. They say life can turn on a dime and that was certainly true for my husband, Erik, and me.

Early in our first pregnancy all seemed to be going well when I very unexpectedly went into labor at 25 weeks. Though my doctors did everything they could to stop my delivery, our son Benson was born almost four months early on Sept. 11, 2011, at the University of Washington Medical Center (UWMC). He weighed a pound and a half, measured 11 inches long and immediately received a breathing tube because he couldn’t breathe on his own.

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Jennifer’s story of struggle and hope after twin boys born at just 24 weeks

In honor of World Prematurity Day this Sunday, Nov. 17, Jennifer Sinconis shares her twin boys’ incredible struggle and journey after being born at just 24 weeks, each weighing only about a pound.

Aidan and Ethan todayI remember finding out I was pregnant. My husband and I had just started trying, and we couldn’t have been happier. I also remember the shock when I found out I was carrying twins – identical twin boys. My pregnancy was pretty easy and uneventful. I was young and healthy, so we really didn’t have any major concerns. Looking back, that shows exactly how naïve I was of the potential complications that can come during a pregnancy.

The day that I hit 24 weeks I ended up being rushed to the ER. My placenta had detached, I was hemorrhaging and my boys were on their way. The doctors tried unsuccessfully to stop the labor. I remember asking my OB-GYN what this meant. What would happen if my children were born this early?  His response was simply, “It’s not good.”

Born 16 weeks premature, Aidan weighed 1 pound, 14 ounces and Ethan weighed 1 pound, 6 ounces. Neither one was breathing when they were born. The doctors were able to resuscitate Aidan fairly quickly, but Ethan took about five minutes. His throat was so tiny that they had a hard time getting the ventilator tube in.

My world shattered. I was not able to move after my emergency C-section, and it was over 24 hours before I was allowed to see my boys. I remember the panic in my mom’s face that evening – she was sure that I would miss the opportunity to see them alive.

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Seattle Children’s offers country’s first physical therapy fellowship in neonatology

Neonatal physical therapy fellowshipIn December 2012, Seattle Children’s became the first (and for now, the only) place in the nation that offers physical therapists an accredited fellowship in neonatology. For seasoned pediatric physical therapists who want to work with the tiniest, most fragile babies, the fellowship offers a unique opportunity for training.

In December, the American Board of Physical Therapy Residency and Fellowship Education (the credentialing arm of the American Physical Therapy Association, or APTA) accredited the neonatology fellowship, which is a partnership between Children’s and Rocky Mountain University of the Health Professions (RMUoHP) in Provo, Utah.

The fellowship, which focuses on babies from birth to 12 months of age, combines six academic credits at RMUoHP with 1,000 hours of mentored clinical training at Children’s. Read full post »

Seattle Children’s receives designation as first Level IV neonatal intensive care unit in Washington

NICU newbornThe Washington State Department of Health has designated the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) at Seattle Children’s Hospital as a Level IV regional NICU, which is the highest level of care available for critically ill newborns. Seattle Children’s is the first hospital in Washington state to receive this designation.

The new designation of Seattle Children’s NICU follows the recent revision of the state’s Perinatal and Neonatal Level of Care Guidelines by the Department of Health in February 2013. The revision is in line with the updated American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) standards for NICUs that were outlined in September 2012.

The guidelines define four levels of care: normal newborn nursery (level I), special care nursery for premature and mildly ill newborns (level II), neonatal intensive care for very premature and critically ill newborns that sometimes offer select surgical procedures (level III), and regional NICU with comprehensive services to treat all medical and surgical problems of newborns (level IV). Read full post »