Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

All Articles in the Category ‘Orthopedics and Sports Medicine’

Grateful for the Ability to Walk, Makenna Raises Money for Seattle Children’s

Wenatcee Wagon DriveFour years ago, Makenna Schwab, 12, and her mother Melissa Schwab began brainstorming ways they could give back to Seattle Children’s Hospital, their home away from home throughout Makenna’s childhood.

“I wanted do give back to the hospital that gave so much to me,” said Makenna. “Because of Seattle Children’s, I can walk and live independently.”

In 2011, Makenna decided to raise money for Seattle Children’s by selling lemonade and cookies. She raised more than $6,700 that first year, but the Schwab family didn’t want to stop there, and a yearly tradition was born.

In 2012, Makenna collected 650 new toys for Seattle Children’s. She wanted to cheer up kids who had to spend the holidays in the hospital. The following year she wanted to do even more. She sold 530 dozen donuts, and collected more than $7,500 for the hospital. Read full post »

Sports Medicine Doctors Use Their Own Unique Experiences to Relate to Kids and Teens

Lockhart, Burton & Quitiquit

Drs. Burton, Lockhart and Quitiquit (left to right)

Treating an athlete with a sports inquiry can present a unique challenge to a sports medicine doctor. How do you get a young athlete back into the game as soon as possible, but as safely as possible? It’s a question that can be a difficult one to bridge with an athlete eager to get back to play, especially if it means missing time on the field or court. Parents, coaches, and teammates are all counting on them! But that’s what gives Seattle Children’s Hospital’s Drs. Monique Burton, John Lockhart and Celeste Quitiquit an edge. They’ve all been there.

As former Division I athletes, the trio knows what it’s like to suffer an injury, to push through pain, to the feel pressure of coaches or peers and the feeling of isolation that can come with an injury.

“We not only have the medical training to treat young athletes as pediatricians and sports medicine specialists, but as former Division I athletes who have dealt with our own injuries, we have a perspective that many people might not have,” said Lockhart, who was a wrestler at the University of Illinois. “Name almost any injury, or the vast majority of what we see, and I bet I’ve been through it – concussions, back pain, broken bones, knee problems, torn ligaments. I understand what it feels like when I’m helping one of my patients make a challenging decision, like to have surgery or not. I’ve been in their position making the same decisions.” Read full post »

Is Thank You Enough?

You may remember Kat Tiscornia from September of last year when she shared her experience of battling Ewing sarcoma and becoming “Titanium Girl.” Kat, now a sophomore at Mercer Island High School, asked On the Pulse if she could share an important message with those who cared for her at Seattle Children’s. We think you’ll enjoy reading it as much as we did.

Thank you. It’s just two simple words. In some languages it’s just one, gracias or merci for example. I was brought up to say thank you all the time. Thank you to my teachers, my coaches, my bus driver and the store clerk behind the counter. Are these two words really enough though? What if it’s a big thank you? What if the people you want to thank are the reason you are standing here today?

In March 2013 I was diagnosed with Ewing sarcoma, a rare form of bone cancer. I was at Seattle Children’s Hospital when I first met my oncologist, Dr. Doug Hawkins. I will never forget that day. He had to deliver the worst news of my life. However, as he told me that I had a cancerous tumor in my leg, his voice was full of compassion, patience and honesty. He was honest about how hard this journey I was about to embark on was going to be. I remember being very scared that day, but I never felt hopeless. He had a plan for me and I trusted him. Thank you, Dr. Hawkins. Read full post »

‘Boot Camp’ Designed to Prevent ACL Injuries Keeps Derby Girls Rolling

Seattle Derby Brats WebWatch the derby girls from the Seattle Derby Brats, the largest junior roller derby league in the Northwest, whiz around the roller rink at high speeds, weaving meticulously between skaters and occasionally crashing to the ground, and it’s understandable why safety is a priority for the league. When the Seattle Derby Brats, reached out to Seattle Children’s Hospital’s Athletic Trainers Program, they were hoping to implement a program that would keep the girls safe at practices and matches. But what they got was much more than that.

Seattle Children’s athletic trainers provide an innovative type of customized care that not only treats injuries, but reduces them as well. For the derby girls, that customized care helped prevent a common injury they’re at greater risk for sustaining: tearing their anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). Read full post »

Unique Protocol for Flesh-Eating Bacteria Helps Trey Get Back to Life

TreyLaurenBaseballOn a Saturday in March, 13-year-old Trey Lauren was playing with his friends at a birthday party when he fell and cut his knee on a nail. It was a typical injury for a kid his age, but what resulted was anything but typical.

Trey was taken to a local emergency room that night, and by Sunday morning his wound had been closed with six stitches. But when Monday morning came, he was too sick with a fever to go to school, and his knee had begun to swell. Trey’s parents, Mark and Randi Lauren, decided to take him to urgent care, where his stitches were removed and he was started on antibiotics. However, later that night, Trey’s fever persisted, and the swelling in his knee had only gotten worse.

One trip to the emergency room later, Trey received an additional dose of broad spectrum antibiotics, and the decision was made to transfer him to Seattle Children’s Hospital. Read full post »

Paul Excels Through His Physical Disability, Never Allowing It to Dictate His Life

Paul Young ChildPaul Wright dreamed of one day living in Seattle’s bustling downtown and working in one of the many sprawling skyscrapers. But as a boy, it seemed like a near-impossible dream. He was born with a physical disability, arthrogryposis, a condition that prevents joints from moving as much as normal. Doctors thought he would never walk much less live an independent life. Wright has done that and much more, and on June 14, will head back to his alma mater, Western Washington University, for this year’s commencement ceremony. He is one of six 2014 Presidential Scholars that will be recognized for outstanding scholarship and service to the community. Below is Wright’s story, in his own words, from diagnosis at birth to successful business man. Read full post »

A family comes full circle when a genetic mutation passes from grandmother to daughter to granddaughter

Meet Olivia Rickert and Michile Smith: Two generations apart, but linked forever by their special hands.

When Olivia Rickert was still in utero, an ultrasound at 20 weeks revealed that she had inherited a genetic mutation passed down from her mother and maternal grandmother. In Olivia’s case, the mutation was expressed as a cleft (split) hand. Though most kids born with this condition have no other health problems and can overcome their hand difference naturally or with surgery, Olivia’s mom (Stephanie Rickert) worried it might signal worse news. Stephanie had little outward sign of the mutation, but her mother, Michile Gormley Smith, was born with split hand/split foot absent long bone syndrome — claw-like hands and feet and legs missing tibia bones. (Smith was treated at Seattle Children’s starting in 1958 by pioneering orthopedist Dr. Ernest Burgess.)

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Seattle Children’s creates Youth Concussion Research Program

concussionphotoSeattle Children’s clinicians do everything they can to accurately diagnose concussions and recommend the most appropriate treatment. But those tasks are difficult without definitive diagnostic tools to determine when concussions have occurred or objective evidence to prove which treatments are best.

To provide better care, physicians need better research. That is why Seattle Children’s Research Institute has created the Youth Concussion Research Program.

The new program, made possible by a generous $5 million gift from The Satterberg Foundation, is designed to develop new concussion diagnostic tools; measure sports impacts using real-time sensors; and begin clinical trials to determine which concussion treatments are most effective.

“There are so many people who want to know how to prevent concussions and long-term effects,” said Frederick Rivara, MD, MPH, who will lead the Youth Concussion Research Program. “I hope we will soon be able to answer a lot of their questions.” Read full post »

Tips for identifying, treating and reducing risk of three common fall sports injuries

Breaking the TackleShorter days and cooling temperatures mean school is in full swing. While it’s important to help students succeed in the classroom, it’s also important to arm them with the right tools and information for a fun and safe fall sports season.

Monique Burton, MD, director of Seattle Children’s Sports Medicine Program, shares tips for identifying, treating and reducing risk of concussions, anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries and shin splints – three of the most common fall sports injuries in young athletes. Each year, Burton and her team provide care and rehabilitation to hundreds of athletes in the Puget Sound.
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Do Sports Derail Children’s Healthy Eating Habits?

A new study says “yes.”

University of Minnesota researchers interviewed the parents of 60 youth basketball players and found that the young athletes commonly had sweets, such as candy, ice cream and doughnuts; pizza; hot dogs; salty snacks, including chips, nachos and cheese puff and soda and sports drinks.

The parents also reported frequent visits to fast-food restaurants when their children were playing sports.

And, even though the parents agreed that these foods and beverages are unhealthy, they said rushing to practices and games made them rely more on these types of products due to their convenience. Read full post »