Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

All Articles in the Category ‘Orthopedics and Sports Medicine’

Doctor Gets Creative with Casts for Little Girl with Cerebral Palsy

Lauren Huber 004

Dr. Yandow poses with Lauren by her bedside at Seattle Children’s.

For a child, having to wear a bulky, fiberglass cast around an arm or leg might not sound like a fun treatment option, especially when they need to wear it for up to six weeks.

So doctors at Seattle Children’s are doing what they can to make the experience a little more fun.

“What color casts would you like?” Dr. Suzanne Yandow, chief of Orthopedics and Sports Medicine at Seattle Children’s, asked Lauren Huber, 4.

Lauren looked up at Yandow with her big blue eyes, holding tightly to her baby doll, Kiddo, and exclaimed, “Pink!” without hesitation. “But I’d also like a little purple for my twin sister,” Lauren added as she looked at her mom. “Her favorite color is purple, so I want purple. But just a little. I want it to be mostly pink,” she said. Read full post »

Makenna Hopes to Raise $10,000 for the Hospital that Saved Her Life

Makenna with the 33 wagons she collected last year.

Makenna with the 33 wagons she collected last year.

Makenna Schwab is at it again. She’s a 12-year-old on a philanthropic mission to raise more than $10,000 for Seattle Children’s, a place she says saved her life.

Makenna, who donated 33 red Radio Flyer wagons to the hospital last December, has two new goals this year: raise money for a low radiation X-ray machine for kids at the hospital, and fund a years worth of “MakPaks” for inpatient families. MakPaks provide a bag of groceries to parents and caregivers who don’t want to leave their child’s bedside or can’t afford food during extended hospital stays. Read full post »

Doctors Use Magnets to Correct Scoliosis for Children with Severe Curves

IMG_20150818_101756Alexander (Alex) Conrad, 8, is one of a kind. He lives with an extremely rare chromosomal deletion, which has unfortunately caused a variety of complex medical issues, including a severe form of scoliosis.

By the time Alex was 2 years old, he’d endured numerous surgeries to fix a variety of physical abnormalities. His 70 degree spinal curvature was the last hurdle the family hoped to face.

“We’d spent so much time in the hospital already,” said Jared Conrad, Alex’s father. “We were really hoping that the scoliosis wouldn’t require more surgery.”

Dr. Klane White, a pediatric orthopedic surgeon at Seattle Children’s, couldn’t make that promise, but he did have good news for the Conrad family. White is one of a few surgeons in the region using the new technology known as the MAGEC (MAGnetic Expansion Control) system. Read full post »

Is it Growing Pains or Something More?

Many kids can relate to the unpleasant experience of growing pains – they come on at night and can cause sharp, shooting, as well as dull and nagging pain. But what people may not know is what causes them, why do they affect some children and not others, and most importantly, when should parents be concerned that they could be something much more serious?

Dr. Suzanne Marie Yandow, chief of Orthopedics and Sports Medicine at Seattle Children’s Hospital, answers these common questions below.

What causes growing pains?

The direct cause of growing pains is unknown, but they typically present in children 3 to 5 years of age and may persist much later in some cases in kids ages 8 to 12. Some studies have shown that more than one out of three children displays symptoms at some point in their lives, and the symptoms most often arise during periods of rapid growth.

What are the common symptoms?

Growing pains often come on in the evening and at night, and the pain is usually in the muscles rather than the joints. This pain usually presents bilaterally, meaning the pain will occur in both legs, rather than just one or the other. Frequently they are present in the front of the legs or shin area.

Read full post »

World Cup Shines Light on Female Concussions

Girls Soccer - WebThe Women’s World Cup is underway in Canada and soccer fans have been tuning in to watch some of the most elite female soccer players in the world compete for the title of world champion. But while most of the attention is on the competition itself, it’s also an opportune time to talk about one of the risks of the sport, concussions, according to Dr. Samuel Browd, a pediatric neurosurgeon and medical director of Seattle Children’s Sports Concussion Program.

“Soccer is commonly called out as an example of a sport that has a high incidence of female concussion,” Browd said. “And this is for a couple different reasons. One is pure numbers. Many women play soccer causing the sport to have a higher concussion rate. Women commonly get a concussion from heading the ball or from falling and hitting their head on the ground. But another reason is simply due to the way the sport is played: aggressively.” Read full post »

Doctor Offers Tips to Prevent Overuse Injuries

ThinkstockPhotos-166214839Spring has sprung and spring sports are underway. Children and teens are back on the baseball mound, track and soccer field, and while playing sports is a great source of exercise for kids, they can also cause injury and pain if children try to spring back too fast. To help keep kids healthy and active this season, Dr. Thomas Jinguji, a sports medicine doctor at Seattle Children’s Hospital, offers tips for parents and coaches to make sure pain isn’t a part of a child’s season.

With more children and teens participating in recreational sports and organized activities, it’s not surprising that overuse injuries, or damage to a bone, muscle, ligament or tendon caused by stress from repetitive actions, are common. According to the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), half of all sports medicine injuries in children and teens are from overuse. And with longer seasons, more intensity during practices and games and more pressure to succeed, it’s no wonder Seattle Children’s is seeing an increase in these types of injuries. Read full post »

Doctor Explains Why Osteoporosis is a Pediatric Disorder, the Importance of Vitamin D

Vitamin DWhen people think of osteoporosis, most likely, they wouldn’t think about kids and teens. However, Dr. Michael Goldberg, director of Seattle Children’s Hospital’s Skeletal Health Program, says osteoporosis is actually a pediatric disorder and childhood is the best time to think about bone health. By thinking about bone health at an early age, individuals can ensure they have strong bones later in life.

“Bones are very much alive,” said Goldberg. “From birth until age 35 you make more bone than you dissolve. From age 35 on, you dissolve more bone than you make. Think of it like needing a bone bank account. You need to make a lot of bone deposits early on; otherwise there won’t be much left when you’re old.”

And the best way to strengthen and build bone is with calcium and vitamin D. Read full post »

Sarah Wins $100,000 Scholarship, Showcases Football Skills After Spinal Fusion

Sarah and CheckThe Pac-12 Football Championship Game featuring the Oregon Ducks and the Arizona Wildcats was more than just a football game to 18-year-old Sarah Roundtree, a freshman at the University of Oregon. It was the chance of a lifetime: a shot to win a $100,000 scholarship. The only catch to winning, she had to compete against another individual in a football throwing contest in front of thousands of screaming football fans at the championship game.

What makes Roundtree’s story so incredible isn’t only the fact that she won; it’s her journey to the championship that makes her special. Less than a year ago, Roundtree was at Seattle Children’s Hospital undergoing an operation to fix two 50 degree curves in her spine.

“Looking back at the past year, I can’t believe I’m where I am today,” said Roundtree. Read full post »

A Year in Review, Looking Back at the Top Posts of 2014

New YearIn honor of the New Year, we’re taking a look back at some of our most popular and memorable blog posts from 2014. Below is a list of our top 10 posts. Here’s to another great year of health news to come. Happy New Year!

Lung Liquid Similar to One Used in Movie “The Abyss” Saves Infant’s Life, Doctors Encourage FDA Approval of Clinical Trials

Two doctors at Seattle Children’s went the extra mile to save Tatiana, one of the sickest babies they’ve ever seen. They got ‪FDA‬ approval to use a long-forgotten drug and are now inspired to help make this drug available to save more lives.

Visit with Macklemore Helps 6-Year-Old Heart Patient Recover

AJ Hwangbo was a happy-go-lucky 6-year-old without a worry in the world until mid-November when he developed a life-threatening heart condition. While specialists at Seattle Children’s Hospital helped AJ heal physically, the young boy struggled to bounce back emotionally. But, AJ’s joyful spirit returned after hospital staff arranged for him to meet his hero – local artist Macklemore. Read full post »

Grateful for the Ability to Walk, Makenna Raises Money for Seattle Children’s

Wenatcee Wagon DriveFour years ago, Makenna Schwab, 12, and her mother Melissa Schwab began brainstorming ways they could give back to Seattle Children’s Hospital, their home away from home throughout Makenna’s childhood.

“I wanted to give back to the hospital that gave so much to me,” said Makenna. “Because of Seattle Children’s, I can walk and live independently.”

In 2011, Makenna decided to raise money for Seattle Children’s by selling lemonade and cookies. She raised more than $6,700 that first year, but the Schwab family didn’t want to stop there, and a yearly tradition was born.

In 2012, Makenna collected 650 new toys for Seattle Children’s. She wanted to cheer up kids who had to spend the holidays in the hospital. The following year she wanted to do even more. She sold 530 dozen donuts, and collected more than $7,500 for the hospital. Read full post »