Patient Care

All Articles in the Category ‘Patient Care’

A Tribute to Our CEO, Dr. Tom Hansen

On May 1, Dr. Tom Hansen will step down as Seattle Children’s CEO after 10 years of service. During his leadership, Hansen was known as a visionary with big ideas – big ideas that helped us become one of the best children’s hospitals in the world while getting us closer than ever to achieving our goal of eliminating pediatric disease.

In May, Hansen will pass the CEO baton to Dr. Jeff Sperring, but he has no plans to stop innovating on behalf of Seattle Children’s. He will be returning to his research roots full time, continuing to pursue his passion of helping improve outcomes for premature infants as an investigator at Seattle Children’s Research Institute. In his research, he will focus on the development of low-cost ventilators for premature infants born in low- and middle-income countries. Read full post »

Disconnecting the Brain, Reconnecting with Life

Sage Taylor was born with a severe malformation in the right hemisphere of her brain – a condition that caused her to have hundreds of tiny “micro” seizures every day. Here, mom Sam Rosen reflects on their leap of faith with a neurosurgeon at Seattle Children’s and how Sage’s life took a dramatic turn for the better.

Sage Taylor

Sage Taylor, now 9 years old, came to Seattle Children’s soon after she was born because she was having hundreds of tiny seizures each day.

In October 2005 my husband Don Taylor and I were blessed with a second daughter. All prenatal tests were normal and my delivery was easy. She was perfect, though more restless than our older daughter and not as good of a sleeper.

Three weeks after Sage came into the world, I was taking a post-partum class for new moms. The nurse instructor took me aside and encouraged me to take Sage to Seattle Children’s as soon as possible for an EEG – a test that measures and records the brain’s electrical activity. She explained she thought Sage had a very slight jerkiness of movement in her arms and legs that might not be normal.

And so began our journey with the incredible doctors and nurses at Seattle Children’s. Read full post »

Standardizing Appendicitis Care

Dr. Adam Goldin with patient Elias Metallo

Dr. Adam Goldin with patient Elias Metallo

This story was originally featured in Seattle Children’s Hospital 2014 Academic Annual Report. The report provides a look into the top clinical and research accomplishments that took place at Seattle Children’s in 2014.

Appendicitis is one of the most common reasons children need surgery, yet diagnosis and treatment approaches vary greatly among hospitals and caregivers and are not always based on best practices.

The Washington State Hospital Association (WSHA) chose Drs. Adam Goldin and Daniel Ledbetter as part of a statewide team to draft standardized diagnostic and clinical care guidelines for appendicitis in 2014. The goals for the new guidelines are to reduce radiation exposure, provide clear guidance for giving antibiotics and outline other evidence-based practices to improve care for hundreds of children throughout Washington state each year. Read full post »

Music Therapy: Treating the Souls and Spirits of Patients

David Knott and Betsy Hartman may not wear a white coat or operate a stethoscope, but for patients at Seattle Children’s, they offer a unique kind of medicine in the form of music. Both board-certified music therapists, Knott and Hartman pair their musical talents with their passion to help heal patients at Seattle Children’s Hospital through music therapy.

Music therapy is the use of music to achieve non-musical goals, such as reducing the perception of pain, providing opportunities for non-verbal expression and facilitating rehabilitation and relaxation. Knott and Hartman use singing, listening to music and playing instruments to help treat patients of all ages spanning a variety of health issues. Read full post »

New Clinic Offers Families the Chance to Challenge Food Allergies

Colin Wenrick, 6, had a frightening allergic reaction to a granola bar when he was just 2 years old. Even after an allergy skin test, his mom was not sure which foods he was truly allergic to.

Colin Wenrick, 6, had a frightening allergic reaction to a granola bar when he was just 2 years old. Even after an allergy skin test, his mom was not sure which foods he was truly allergic to.

Jennifer Wenrick’s son Colin, 6, had a frightening allergic reaction to a granola bar when he was just 2 years old. After consuming the snack, he immediately broke out with hives and began vomiting.

“It was terrifying,” Wenrick said. “I knew something was seriously wrong right away and rushed him to the doctor.”

Soon after, Colin was screened for food allergies and tested positive for peanut, tree nut and sesame seed allergies. For the next three years, Wenrick vigilantly kept her son away from these foods.

“It was a life-changing experience,” Wenrick said. “Food allergies permeate every aspect of your life, from traveling to preschool to Halloween candy. Every time he ate I could feel myself tensing in fear.”

But recently, Wenrick learned Colin could safely enjoy peanut products after he participated in a food allergy challenge at Seattle Children’s Food Allergy Challenge Clinic, part of the Seattle Food Allergy Consortium. Read full post »

VADs 101: Lifesaving Heart Devices

The language of medicine is full of complicated words and acronyms. For parents of children with serious heart conditions like congenital heart disease or pulmonary hypertension, one such acronymn that may incite fear or worry is hearing that their child may need a device called a VAD (Ventricular Assist Device). However, these devices, combined with Seattle Children’s Heart Center’s medical expertise, save the lives of many children and teens each year.

What is a VAD?

A ventricular assist device (VAD) is a mechanical pump a surgeon implants inside or outside a child’s chest and connects to the heart during open-heart surgery. A VAD can be used for patients waiting for a heart transplant or for patients whose heart muscle needs to rest. Seattle Children’s has a variety of VAD options for patients large and small, from tiny babies to young adults, which aren’t available at every hospital. VAD options at Seattle Children’s include the Berlin Heart, CentriMag and PediMag centrifugal pumps, HeartMate II, Heartware HVAD and SynCardia Total Artificial Heart (TAH).

The newer, fully implantable VADs like the HeartMate II, Heartware HVAD or TAH can also greatly enhance the quality of life for many patients who are awaiting a heart transplant, often allowing them to leave the hospital. For one such patient from Hawaii named Julie Kobayashi, her implantable VAD even allowed her to leave the hospital while she waited for a heart and achieve her dream of playing in the snow for the first time.

To learn about each type of VAD, watch the video above as cardiac surgeons Dr. Jonathan Chen and Dr. Michael McMullan explain the many types that Seattle Children’s offers, and why it’s important to choose the device that best matches a child’s needs.

Read full post »

How to Handle a Difficult Prenatal Diagnosis

Whether it’s a parent’s first or fourth child, pregnancy can be filled with equal parts excitement and anxiety. Expectant parents can opt for their doctors to perform a variety of prenatal tests to screen for genetic abnormalities or birth defects while the baby is still developing. If these screening tests come back positive, parents are referred to genetics counselors like me to learn more about their diagnostic testing options. A diagnostic test can be done to confirm if your baby does or does not have the condition. Depending on individual circumstances, some families pursue diagnostic testing during a pregnancy while others elect to pursue testing after the baby is born.

Once a diagnosis is made, families can meet with specialists to learn more about both short and long term care for their baby.

Seattle Children’s Prenatal Diagnosis and Treatment team sees families every day who recently received unexpected prenatal test results. These families come to us with questions and may feel anxious about next steps. We’re here to help give parents the information they need to prepare for the future. Read full post »

Study Predicts Which Children with Craniosynostosis Most Likely to Suffer From Learning Deficits

After Olivia Bush was diagnosed with single-suture craniosynostosis at just 3 months old, her parents did not know how the condition would affect her brain development over time. A new study led by Seattle Children's is addressing these concerns.

After Olivia Bush was diagnosed with single-suture craniosynostosis, her parents did not know how her brain would develop over time. A new study led by Seattle Children’s is addressing these concerns.

Seattle Children’s researchers have published the results of a 10-year, multi-site study tracking the cognitive development of children with single-suture craniosynostosis from infancy to school age. The results could help families and clinicians better predict which children with this condition are at greater risk of having learning deficits so that they might intervene early in the child’s life.

The study, published today by the American Academy of Pediatrics and titled “Intellectual and Academic Functioning of School-Age Children with Single-Suture Craniosynostosis,” reported children with single-suture craniosynostosis, on average, were more likely than children without the disorder to have learning deficits once they started school. However, despite this trend, a little over half of the children with single-suture craniosynostosis showed no discernible learning problems.

Living with the unknown

The research is significant for parents like Cindy and Todd Bush. Twelve years ago, Cindy and Todd learned their 3-month-old daughter, Olivia, had craniosynostosis, a condition in which one or more of the special joints in a baby’s skull (sutures) grow together (fuse) earlier than normal. When these joints come together too early, a baby’s skull cannot grow properly. Craniosynostosis occurs in approximately one in 1700-2500 live births. Corrective surgery to restore the suture is preferentially performed in the first year of life. Read full post »

3-D Printed Heart Model Makes Complicated Surgeries Possible

Dr. Stephen Seslar prepares for a complicated surgery using a new, realistic heart model created with 3-D printing.

Dr. Stephen Seslar prepares for a complicated surgery using a new, realistic heart model created with 3-D printing.

Kami Sutton, 26, who you met last week, has been waiting for a heart transplant for five years. But surgeons at Seattle Children’s and University of Washington Medical Center (UWMC) are now preparing to perform a difficult surgery that could greatly improve her quality of life and may even eliminate her need for a transplant. It’s possible for the first time ever, thanks to a new, realistic heart model created with 3-D printing. Read full post »

Kami Shares her Congenital Heart Defect Journey, Reflects on Her “Home”

In honor of Congenital Heart Defect (CHD) Awareness Week, 26-year-old Kami Sutton wanted to share her journey that began at Seattle Children’s the day she was born.

26-year-old Kami Sutton

26-year-old Kami Sutton

Seattle Children’s is my home. From the previously trademark blue bubble letters, the giraffes (which were recently replaced in the remodel), trains and Mickey Mouse – it is home. It is full of the people who I have trusted with my life since before I can even remember.

I was transferred to Seattle Children’s from a local hospital on Sept. 21, 1988, at only four hours old after being delivered via emergency C-section. I was blue and unable to breathe on my own. My parents were told I most likely would not survive the 30 minute trip down I-5 to the hospital. Read full post »