Pediatric Surgery

All Articles in the Category ‘Pediatric Surgery’

Born with Bladder Outside His Body, Little Boy Helps Others with Rare Condition

Mick as baby - black and whiteWhen Mick Hullinger was born, the atmosphere in the birthing room was not what Leah Hullinger, a first time mother, had envisioned. Although all the ultrasounds had come back normal, as soon as Hullinger’s baby was placed on her chest, she realized something was wrong. Mick was born with bladder exstrophy, in which the bladder doesn’t grow correctly and sticks outside the abdomen, a rare disorder that happens in about 1 in 30,000 babies.

Mick was whisked away by ambulance to a specialty hospital in Salt Lake City, where the family lived.

“It was a whirlwind,” said Hullinger. “I checked out of the hospital only 12 hours after giving birth. I needed to be by his side. I never pictured this would happen; it’s not what you imagine when you’re having a baby.” Read full post »

Top 10 Questions Kids Ask Before Surgery

LIttle Girl QuestionsSurgery may sound like a scary experience, especially for children and teenagers, but it’s often necessary to help make them feel better and get back to life as usual. Below, Dr. Patrick Javid, a pediatric surgeon at Seattle Children’s, answers some of the most common questions he gets asked by patients and families before surgery.

Every week at Seattle Children’s, we perform 250-300 operations on children ranging from 2 hours old to 20 years old. Let’s just say that our operating room (“the OR” for short) is a happening place. As a pediatric surgeon, operating on children to improve their health and fight disease is what I do, day in and day out.

Having an operation can be really scary. Let’s face it — the OR is an unfamiliar and intimidating place if you don’t work there every day. In an effort to give children (and their parents, of course) a better understanding of what it means to have an operation at Seattle Children’s, here’s a list of my “Top 10 Favorite Questions from Kids Before Surgery.”

Drum roll, please… Read full post »

Born with Organs on the Outside, Onora is now a Happy, Healthy Toddler

Onora and Mom Reading

Kristen reads to Onora.

This week, in honor of Mother’s Day, we’re sharing stories about mothers who have found hope through difficult diagnosis and became advocates for other parents and families.

Kristen Moriarty of Missoula, Mont., was 22 weeks into her pregnancy with her daughter, Onora, when a routine visit to their OB-GYN turned into shock and concern. Onora was diagnosed with omphalocele, a rare condition in which the intestines or other organs grow outside of the baby’s body and the umbilical cord forms a sac around them.

Moriarty and her husband had a big decision to make – where would they go to receive care for their little girl? Montana wasn’t an option, so they packed up all their belongings and moved. Read full post »

A Mother’s Journey to Find Hope for Her Baby Diagnosed with CDH

IMG_20150223_091708440Kara Strozyk was expecting a normal ultrasound at a routine prenatal appointment with her OB-GYN in Olympia, Wash., 19 weeks into her pregnancy. What should have been one of the best days of her life, quickly turned into one of her worst. “How does he look?” Strozyk asked the ultrasound technician.

The ultrasound image revealed the unthinkable, an abnormality with the baby’s stomach, small and large intestine, spleen and liver; they appeared to be in his chest. Strozyk was in disbelief. Her baby was prenatally diagnosed with a congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH), a hole in his diaphragm, a potentially life-threatening condition.

The advice she received only added more fear to the diagnosis: “Stay off the internet.” Read full post »

Coins, Blow Darts and Button Batteries: The Diary of an Otolaryngologist

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Dr. Sie’s collection of items removed in surgery

They say that life is all about the little things, and for the Otolaryngology care team at Seattle Children’s Hospital, this statement holds true more often than not. Each year more than 150 children find their way to the Seattle Children’s Otolaryngology clinic to have some kind of household object, or “foreign body,” removed from their ear, nose or throat.

These objects, while sometimes but not always small, and ranging from coins to button batteries, have become part of a unique collection that hangs in Dr. Kathleen Sie’s office. It’s a collection that she hopes will raise awareness for parents and caregivers about the prevalence of many dangerous household items that often hide in plain sight.

Read full post »

Teen Offers Hope to Others Living with Crohn’s Disease

Lizzy Hiking

Elizabeth doesn’t let Crohn’s slow her down, enjoys hiking.

Elizabeth McIntosh, 19, has been through a lot to get to where she is today. Diagnosed with Crohn’s disease, one of the most common types of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), at age 2, she felt like she was never going to be able to have a normal life – one uninterrupted by Crohn’s flare ups and debilitating abdominal pain.

But after undergoing surgery to remove more than three feet of her colon, she’s finally living the life she’s always hoped to live and wants to offer support to others living with Crohn’s.

“Never lose hope,” said McIntosh, who’s been a patient at Seattle Children’s since diagnosis. “You may have a long journey ahead of you, but you always have to have hope. It will get better.” Read full post »

Fashion Show Helps Children and Teenagers End Ostomy Surgery Stigma

Lizzy

Elizabeth McIntosh, 19

A unique fashion show took place at Seattle Children’s Hospital this weekend during the Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) Conference, presented by the Northwest Chapter of the Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation of America and Seattle Children’s. To help end stigmas around ostomies, eight children and teenagers with inflammatory bowel disease, ages 8 to 20, walked the runway styled head-to-toe in the latest spring fashions by Nordstrom. Four of the children in the fashion show had ostomies, two did not have ostomies, and two of the models have IBD, but do not have an ostomy.

The only question was: did the audience know which models had ostomies and which didn’t?

The answer was a resounding “No.” Read full post »

Standardizing Appendicitis Care

Dr. Adam Goldin with patient Elias Metallo

Dr. Adam Goldin with patient Elias Metallo

This story was originally featured in Seattle Children’s Hospital 2014 Academic Annual Report. The report provides a look into the top clinical and research accomplishments that took place at Seattle Children’s in 2014.

Appendicitis is one of the most common reasons children need surgery, yet diagnosis and treatment approaches vary greatly among hospitals and caregivers and are not always based on best practices.

The Washington State Hospital Association (WSHA) chose Drs. Adam Goldin and Daniel Ledbetter as part of a statewide team to draft standardized diagnostic and clinical care guidelines for appendicitis in 2014. The goals for the new guidelines are to reduce radiation exposure, provide clear guidance for giving antibiotics and outline other evidence-based practices to improve care for hundreds of children throughout Washington state each year. Read full post »

3-D Printed Heart Model Makes Complicated Surgeries Possible

Dr. Stephen Seslar prepares for a complicated surgery using a new, realistic heart model created with 3-D printing.

Dr. Stephen Seslar prepares for a complicated surgery using a new, realistic heart model created with 3-D printing.

Kami Sutton, 26, who you met last week, has been waiting for a heart transplant for five years. But surgeons at Seattle Children’s and University of Washington Medical Center (UWMC) are now preparing to perform a difficult surgery that could greatly improve her quality of life and may even eliminate her need for a transplant. It’s possible for the first time ever, thanks to a new, realistic heart model created with 3-D printing. Read full post »

Seattle Children’s Leads Nation in Heart Transplant Survival Rates

Julie Kobayashi, 12, traveled from Hawaii to Seattle Children’s for her heart transplant.

Julie Kobayashi, 12, traveled from Hawaii to Seattle Children’s for her heart transplant.

Children who need a heart transplant face a frightening waiting game before a donor heart becomes available. They must live with a failing heart for months, or even years, as clinicians strive to keep them healthy enough for transplant. Nationally, these patients face the highest waiting list mortality in solid-organ transplantation medicine, with 17% of children dying while waiting for a heart transplant.

Thankfully, Seattle Children’s has one of the best waitlist mortality rates among pediatric heart transplant centers, as reported to the United Network of Organ Sharing. The hospital also treats some of the region’s most complex, advanced heart disease and heart transplant cases and has one of the highest 3-year patient survival rates in the country.

“We are proud to be ranked among the best pediatric heart transplant centers in the country,” said Dr. Yuk Law, medical director of the Cardiac Transplant/Heart Failure Service at Seattle Children’s. “We have created a team of skilled experts who have dedicated their careers to treating heart failure and transplant cases.” Read full post »