Philanthropy

All Articles in the Category ‘Philanthropy’

The Heart of Racing Wins for Seattle Children’s Heart Patients

IMG_4995The Heart of Racing team is focused on two things – winning races and raising money for kids at Seattle Children’s. They race, and win, for children who need complex cardiac care. And their checkered flag won’t wave until they’ve helped to fix every little heart that needs mending. To date, they’ve raised more than $5 million for Seattle Children’s Heart Center, and helped to fund a new state-of-the art cardiac catheterization laboratory at Seattle Children’s which opened earlier this year.

“When you put the right people together, there’s nothing you can’t do,” said Don Kitch, who founded the Team Seattle Guild at Seattle Children’s and The Heart of Racing Team. “There’s nothing like Seattle Children’s Cath Lab in the world, and we made it happen with a race car! It’s absolutely incredible to think about. We’re giving kids the chance for a happy, healthy life.” Read full post »

Parker’s Journey From Heart Transplant to Race Track

image18Parker Rana, 15, has truly overcome the odds to get to where he is today. Born with multiple heart defects, Parker grew up in and out of the hospital. But now, he’s a thriving teenager with an incredible story of hope.

Below is Parker’s story: from hospital bed to trackside, cheering on his favorite racing team, The Heart of Racing.

An unexpected delivery

Jaydine Rana, Parker’s mother, was expecting a healthy baby boy when she delivered Parker on June 2, 1999 in Mt. Vernon, Wash. Unfortunately, she got some unexpected news that day. Parker was born with a combination of four heart defects – a hole in his heart, a missing pulmonary artery and valve, an enlarged ventricle and an overriding aorta. He was airlifted to Seattle Children’s Hospital shortly after birth for treatment. Read full post »

Duffels for Discharge: Bringing Comfort to Kids Who Can’t Go Home

Kristina Spencer with duffels she has filled for acutely abused children discharged to foster homes.

Kristina Spencer with duffels she has filled for acutely abused children discharged to foster homes.

When Kristina Spencer joined the Seattle Children’s Hospital Protection Program team as its senior administrative assistant last summer, she took on another, unofficial role: director of duffels.

The duffels in question – dozens of brightly colored, kid-sized bags stashed around the Protection Program’s offices – had been purchased with grant money and were phase one of Duffels for Discharge, a project aimed at easing the transition for abused children discharged from Seattle Children’s straight into the foster care system. Read full post »

My Little Brother, My Greatest Inspiration: Celebrating the 1-Year Anniversary of Seattle Children’s Alyssa Burnett Center

Mikey

Mikey at high school graduation

April marks the 1-year anniversary of the grand opening of Seattle Children’s Alyssa Burnett Adult Life Center. The Alyssa Burnett Adult Life Center hosts year-round classes for adults with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) or other developmental disabilities. And though it’s only been a year, the Alyssa Burnett Center has already seen great success. Tammy Mitchel, program manager, recounts below her hopes and fears from day one and shares some of her favorite milestones from the past year.

Nearly one year ago, as I was driving to the grand opening of the Alyssa Burnett Adult Life Center, my head swirled with thoughts, hopes, dreams and – admittedly – fears for this journey to open a center for adults with autism. Would it be possible to thoughtfully offer classes to adults with autism and serve a wide spectrum of ability levels? Could we teach adults who had never been in a kitchen how to cook for themselves? Would we be equipped to handle even the most challenging behaviors? And most importantly, could we create a community where all of this could happen under one roof?

I’m so happy to say one year later that yes, we could. And we did. Read full post »

Disconnecting the Brain, Reconnecting with Life

Sage Taylor was born with a severe malformation in the right hemisphere of her brain – a condition that caused her to have hundreds of tiny “micro” seizures every day. Here, mom Sam Rosen reflects on their leap of faith with a neurosurgeon at Seattle Children’s and how Sage’s life took a dramatic turn for the better.

Sage Taylor

Sage Taylor, now 9 years old, came to Seattle Children’s soon after she was born because she was having hundreds of tiny seizures each day.

In October 2005 my husband Don Taylor and I were blessed with a second daughter. All prenatal tests were normal and my delivery was easy. She was perfect, though more restless than our older daughter and not as good of a sleeper.

Three weeks after Sage came into the world, I was taking a post-partum class for new moms. The nurse instructor took me aside and encouraged me to take Sage to Seattle Children’s as soon as possible for an EEG – a test that measures and records the brain’s electrical activity. She explained she thought Sage had a very slight jerkiness of movement in her arms and legs that might not be normal.

And so began our journey with the incredible doctors and nurses at Seattle Children’s. Read full post »

Genetics Research Improves Diagnosis, Treatment of Rare Metabolic Diseases Around the World

Dr. Sihoun Hahn led a collaborative research study which helped a 10-year-old girl walk for the first time in her life.

Dr. Sihoun Hahn led a collaborative research study which helped a 10-year-old girl walk for the first time in her life.

A collaborative research study led by Dr. Sihoun Hahn, director of the Biochemical Genetics program at Seattle Children’s and an investigator within Seattle Children Research Institute’s Center for Developmental Therapeutics, has changed the lives of children around the world and helped a 10-year-old girl walk for the first time.

Research answers a parent’s prayer

Bokyung Kim, a 10-year-old living in Korea, spent most of her life confined to a wheelchair. Doctors suspected that she suffered from muscular dystrophy, but were unable to diagnose her condition. Bokyung’s parents prayed that their daughter would walk one day. So when they had the opportunity to enroll Bokyung in a collaborative research study between Seattle Children’s Research Institute, University of Washington School of Medicine and Seoul National University College of Medicine in Korea, her parents were eager to participate.

“This family never lost hope for their child,” Hahn said. “And neither did we.” Read full post »

NASCAR Driver Kasey Kahne Surprises Kids at Seattle Children’s, Supports Strong Against Cancer

Nicolas Tobias - Web

Kasey Kahne today took some time away from the race track to visit patients at Seattle Children’s Hospital. The NASCAR Sprint Cup Series driver, and Enumclaw, Wash., native made a surprise visit to the hospital after announcing that he’ll be teaming up with Seattle Seahawks quarterback Russell Wilson to help put an end to childhood cancer by choosing Strong Against Cancer as this year’s beneficiary of their fundraising event, The DRIVE.

With toys in hand, he brought much needed smiles and brightened the day for patients and families. The hospital was revving with excitement as Kahne met with kids and teens in a race of their own – a race to feel better and get back to life outside the hospital walls. Read full post »

Captain America Joins Friend Chris Pratt to Surprise Kids at Seattle Children’s

Marvel superhero Chris Evans (Captain America) and friend Chris Pratt (Star-Lord) today made good on a friendly bet that started between the two on Twitter in January after the National Football League playoffs.

The hospital was abuzz as Evans and Pratt brought joy to patients and families at Seattle Children’s. Much like their superhero alter egos, they saved the day in the eyes of the children and teens at the hospital. Read full post »

Kami Shares her Congenital Heart Defect Journey, Reflects on Her “Home”

In honor of Congenital Heart Defect (CHD) Awareness Week, 26-year-old Kami Sutton wanted to share her journey that began at Seattle Children’s the day she was born.

26-year-old Kami Sutton

26-year-old Kami Sutton

Seattle Children’s is my home. From the previously trademark blue bubble letters, the giraffes (which were recently replaced in the remodel), trains and Mickey Mouse – it is home. It is full of the people who I have trusted with my life since before I can even remember.

I was transferred to Seattle Children’s from a local hospital on Sept. 21, 1988, at only four hours old after being delivered via emergency C-section. I was blue and unable to breathe on my own. My parents were told I most likely would not survive the 30 minute trip down I-5 to the hospital. Read full post »

Seattle Children’s Leads Nation in Heart Transplant Survival Rates

Julie Kobayashi, 12, traveled from Hawaii to Seattle Children’s for her heart transplant.

Julie Kobayashi, 12, traveled from Hawaii to Seattle Children’s for her heart transplant.

Children who need a heart transplant face a frightening waiting game before a donor heart becomes available. They must live with a failing heart for months, or even years, as clinicians strive to keep them healthy enough for transplant. Nationally, these patients face the highest waiting list mortality in solid-organ transplantation medicine, with 17% of children dying while waiting for a heart transplant.

Thankfully, Seattle Children’s has one of the best waitlist mortality rates among pediatric heart transplant centers, as reported to the United Network of Organ Sharing. The hospital also treats some of the region’s most complex, advanced heart disease and heart transplant cases and has one of the highest 3-year patient survival rates in the country.

“We are proud to be ranked among the best pediatric heart transplant centers in the country,” said Dr. Yuk Law, medical director of the Cardiac Transplant/Heart Failure Service at Seattle Children’s. “We have created a team of skilled experts who have dedicated their careers to treating heart failure and transplant cases.” Read full post »