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Blessing the Seattle Children’s Story Pole

On June 1, 2022, Seattle Children’s opened the doors to our new Forest B building – the latest addition to the Seattle Children’s hospital campus.

When Seattle Children’s began planning for the Forest B building 10 years ago, we wanted to formally recognize that the hospital is located on the traditional land of the Coast Salish people through an art installation in the lobby. We sought out an artist with a deep understanding of the Pacific Northwest and a whimsical style that patients and families could connect with. We were lucky to find Shaun “Qwalsius” Peterson, who has been creating public art inspired by the Puyallup people’s heritage and the greater Pacific Northwest region for more than 20 years. Qwalsius designed, carved and erected a Story Pole in the Forest B lobby that will now be enjoyed by all the patients, families and workforce members who walk through our doors for decades to come. Read full post »

Seattle Children’s Opens New “Forest B” Building

New “Forest B” Building Features More In-Patient and Operating Rooms, Cancer and Blood Disorders Care Facilities and more

On June 1st, Seattle Children’s opens the latest addition to the hospital campus — a building called “Forest B.”  Forest B is a project over 10 years in the making and will add an additional 310,000 square feet of space to the hospital campus.  

“Forest B is a critical addition to Seattle Children’s, given our region’s incredible historic and anticipated growth,” said Mandy Hansen, senior director of planning, design, and construction at Seattle Children’s. “The building gives our care teams the space they need to provide lifesaving and life-changing treatments, surgeries and procedures to even more patients in the coming years. The thoughtful design will also help us integrate more of our breakthrough research into the clinical care environment as we tirelessly work toward cures.”  Read full post »

Alyssa Burnett Adult Life Center Re-Opens with a Remodeled Space and In-Person Classes

Just in time for Autism Acceptance Month, the Seattle Children’s Alyssa Burnett Adult Life Center (ABC), which offers lifelong learning for people 18+ with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and other developmental disabilities, reopened its expanded doors in late March, rolling out in-person classes for the first time since the COVID pandemic began.   

   Read full post »

Odessa Brown Children’s Clinic Othello: Artist Spotlight Part 5

A five-part series highlighting the local artists commissioned to contribute original artwork to the new clinic 

This is part five of a five-part series. 

 

On March 7, 2022, Seattle Children’s new Odessa Brown Children’s Clinic (OBCC) opened the doors to begin serving patients from a second location in the Othello Square complex. In order to deepen the connection with the area, some 21 artists from the local community who are Black, Latinx or Indigenous were commissioned to contribute more than 30 pieces of original artwork in the new building. Using the guiding principles of art that would support health through nature, celebrate inclusiveness, cultivate wonder and joy, and celebrate and honor history, artwork was carefully selected and placed throughout the clinic to enrich the space. Take a journey below through the special artwork showcased throughout the clinic. 

 

Rae Akino 

Inner Child #1, 2019; Inner Child #2, 2019 – located on the exterior

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Legislative Wins for Child and Youth Behavioral Health in Washington State

The 2022 Washington State Legislative session concluded in mid-March, after a whirlwind 60-day session. This was a historic session for many reasons, especially for child and youth behavioral health.  There has been a growing focus on the national youth mental health crisis over the past year, and we are thrilled at the investment and commitment demonstrated in the legislature.  Read full post »

Odessa Brown Children’s Clinic Othello: Artist Spotlight Part 4

A five-part series highlighting the local artists commissioned to contribute original artwork to the new clinic 

This is part four of a five-part series. Tune in each Friday to see more of our featured local artists. 

 

On March 7, 2022, Seattle Children’s new Odessa Brown Children’s Clinic (OBCC) opened the doors to begin serving patients from a second location in the Othello Square complex. In order to deepen the connection with the area, some 21 artists from the local community who are Black, Latinx or Indigenous were commissioned to contribute more than 30 pieces of original artwork in the new building. Using the guiding principles of art that would support health through nature, celebrate inclusiveness, cultivate wonder and joy, and celebrate and honor history, artwork was carefully selected and placed throughout the clinic to enrich the space. Take a journey below through the special artwork showcased throughout the clinic. 

 

Erin Shigaki  

Usagi と Kitsune (Rabbit + Fox), 2021 – located in a Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT) Playroom

My parents made books exciting and essential for my sisters and me. We were luckily immersed in both American and Japanese children’s tales. In Japanese lore, both rabbit and fox exhibit a range of qualities from kind and selfless, to mischievous and sometimes misguided. My piece is about these complexities within each of us. Regardless, we all deserve bountiful adventures, dreams, and lives. 

 

 

 

Read full post »

Odessa Brown Children’s Clinic Othello: Artist Spotlight Part 3

A five-part series highlighting the local artists commissioned to contribute original artwork to the new clinic 

This is part three of a five-part series. Tune in each Friday to see more of our featured local artists. 

 

On March 7, 2022, Seattle Children’s new Odessa Brown Children’s Clinic (OBCC) opened the doors to begin serving patients from a second location in the Othello Square complex. In order to deepen the connection with the area, some 21 artists from the local community who are Black, Latinx or Indigenous were commissioned to contribute more than 30 pieces of original artwork in the new building. Using the guiding principles of art that would support health through nature, celebrate inclusiveness, cultivate wonder and joy, and celebrate and honor history, artwork was carefully selected and placed throughout the clinic to enrich the space. Take a journey below through the special artwork showcased throughout the clinic. 

 

Vikram Madan 

World Tree, 2021 – located in exit stairway

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“The tree is a metaphor for shelter and community, a gathering place for ‘birds’ of different kinds. Birds, like humans, often make long migrations, which highlight not just their tenacity, but also their fragility and resilience. This artwork uses birds and trees to celebrate diversity, neighborhood, and welcoming community spaces.” 

Read full post »

HHS Secretary Admiral Levine Visits Seattle Children’s to Discuss Youth Mental Health Crisis

Admiral Rachel L. Levine, MD, U.S. Assistant Secretary for Health, made a rare visit to Seattle Children’s on Tuesday. Her visit included a tour of the Psychiatry and Behavioral Medicine Unit (PBMU), Emergency Department and the Seattle Children’s Gender Clinic.   Read full post »

Odessa Brown Children’s Clinic Othello: Artist Spotlight Part 2

A five-part series highlighting the local artists commissioned to contribute original artwork to the new clinic 

This is part two of a five-part series. Tune in each Friday to see more of our featured local artists.

On March 7, 2022, Seattle Children’s new Odessa Brown Children’s Clinic (OBCC) opened the doors to begin serving patients from a second location in the Othello Square complex. In order to deepen the connection with the area, some 21 artists from the local community who are Black, Latinx or Indigenous were commissioned to contribute more than 30 pieces of original artwork in the new building. Using the guiding principles of art that would support health through nature, celebrate inclusiveness, cultivate wonder and joy, and celebrate and honor history, artwork was carefully selected and placed throughout the clinic to enrich the space. Take a journey below through the special artwork showcased throughout the clinic.  

 

Ari Glass 

Path to the Golden Age, 2021 – located in the dental waiting room

“Behold! This artwork serves as a continuation of the mural on the Othello Safeway I painted in collaboration with Craig Cundiff and Henry Luke. Guided by the Sun, endemic species of birds, flowers and animals reflect the people and cultures historically present in Othello. This mural was painted to reverberate a spirit of well-being and engage visitors in modes of play, rest, and discovery.” 

  Read full post »

Seattle Children’s Mobile ECMO Service Treats Critically Ill Kids During Transport Across More Than a Million Square Miles

In 2016, Seattle Children’s extended their mobile extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) capabilities to provide the service to critically ill children during transport to the hospital from anywhere in a five-state region. ECMO is an advanced life-support therapy that functions for the heart and lungs when the organs fail or need to rest. Seattle Children’s became the first children’s hospital on the West Coast to offer mobile ECMO service, providing critically ill patients with life-saving cardiac, respiratory or transplant care while they are being transported to the hospital.

“The main reason we developed mobile ECMO is because it enables us to take care of kids over a very broad region and offer the same type of high-level medical care to the kids who are not fortunate to live near a hospital like Seattle Children’s,” said Dr. Michael McMullan, chief of Cardiac Surgery and director of mechanical cardiac support and extracorporeal life support services at Seattle Children’s, as well as an professor of surgery at the UW School of Medicine. “When we looked at data in Washington state, we found that kids who do not live near a hospital like ours are at a three-fold increased risk of dying of illness due to a lack of access to care.” Read full post »