In celebration of Hispanic Heritage Month, Seattle Children’s Hola Inclusion Network, a group focused on improving connections and services with the Hispanic/Latinx community, invited workforce members, patient families and community members to share their perspectives and stories through art. We have the privilege of sharing the artists’ work.

A collage of two images used in the article.

Two of the entries from the Hispanic Heritage Month art show. See below to view these and other art show pieces and learn about the artists.

Every year from Sept. 15 to Oct. 15, people around the country observe National Hispanic Heritage Month — a celebration of the histories, cultures and incredible contributions of Hispanic and Latinx peoples from Spain, Mexico, the Caribbean, Central America and South America.

This year, Seattle Children’s Hola Inclusion Network invited workforce members, patient families and community members to recognize and celebrate the month in a new way: a first-ever Hispanic Heritage Month art show. The Hola Inclusion Network provides advocacy for and builds community among Seattle Children’s Latinx/Hispanic workforce and allies. The network aims to create better connections within internal and external communities and improve services for Hispanic/Latinx patients and families.

Over the past month, artists have submitted original pieces related to this year’s theme: “Mi Esperanza/My Hope. Yo Soy/I Am.”

Along with other Hispanic Heritage Month events that took place at Children’s — including a display case at the hospital focusing on Latinx futures through education, a panel discussion about Hispanic and Latinx identity through the arts, a Seattle Sounders match outing, and other happenings — the art show focuses on artists with a Latinx/Hispanic identity, or pieces related to Latinx/Hispanic identity, history or achievements.

Seattle Children’s is honored to share the submitted artwork on this blog and on our social media channels. Read on to view the unique and wonderful art pieces and discover ways to celebrate and learn more about the Hispanic and Latinx community — all year long. We’d like to thank all who shared beautiful artwork and their story, perspective, hope and identity.

A child's hand touching an adult's hand.

Artist Name: Vilma Paz Soldan
Department: Transportation/Sustainability, Hola member
Title of Art: “Unconditional Love, A Moment at Home”
Art Media: Photography

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A painting combining the Cuban and Bolivian flags within a heart with a palm tree and the ocean in the background

Artist Name: Mercedes Ortiz Rodriguez
Instagram handle: @Worldly_Impressions
Department: Child Health, Behavior and Development, Hola member
Title of Art: “My Core”
Art Media: Acrylic on canvas

 

From the artist: “Yo soy/ I am Cuban Bolivian American, born and raised for 26 years in Miami, Florida. My mother immigrated from Cuba when she was about 4 years old with her mother and father. My father immigrated from Bolivia as a young adult. With this piece, I wanted to pay homage to both of them, and to their cultures that have influenced who I am. My mom was the artistic soul of the family and fostered my creative side, in particular drawing, painting and photography. Even though currently I love to take pictures of beautiful landscapes, I also enjoy drawing, painting and even digital art; it not only lets me tap into my creative side but also allows me to stay connected to my mother. I am thankful to the Hola Inclusion Network for providing the space and opportunity to create something to represent my love and appreciation to the cultures that made me.”

 

A sketch of a ballet dancer.

Artist Name: Beatriz Cruz
Department: Surgery Coordinators, Hola membership chair
Title of Art: “Freedom in Dance”
Art Media: Sketch

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A sketch of a human heart

Artist Name: Beatriz Cruz
Department: Surgery Coordinators, Hola membership chair
Title of Art: “Le Pregunte a Mi Corazon Por Que Tu Y No Algun Otra” (“I Asked My Heart Why It Picked You and not Another Woman”)
Art Media: Sketch

 

A drawing of an elderly man wearing a hat and holding in a cane with both hands.

Artist Name: Malia D’Alio
Department: Administration, Hola Member, Pasifika chair
Title of Art: “Serapio Cardenas 100 Years”
Art Media: Watercolor pencil (water not yet applied)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

From the artist: “I am Native Hawaiian, Chinese and Croatian, raised in Hawai’i. This is dedicated to one of my best friends, Melissa Cardenas, who recently accepted an amazing new job opportunity outside of Seattle Children’s. Melissa, you will be indescribably missed. It has been an honor and a privilege to work alongside you, learn from you, and grow with you. I love you so much and will miss you terribly. Thank you for being exactly who you are. X.O.

I asked Melissa to describe her grandfather in her own words. She said, “My grandpa, Serapio Cardenas, was a hard worker and traveled to the U.S. with my grandma in 1921 as a migrant worker, finally settling in Washington in 1947. My grandpa grew up in a small village in Mexico called San Luis Potosí with his mom and brother and sister. He never knew his dad but when he married my grandma, he had to take his dad’s name in order to be married — he had gone by his mom’s maiden name, Oviedo. When he was growing up, they had a system in place to hide when Poncho Villa came into town because he would recruit young boys to join him in his killing sprees. My grandpa and grandma raised eight kids and raised three of their grandchildren as their own (my dad helped with the last two). He was so loving and though he seemed tough on the outside he was the cuddliest and kindest man. He learned to read and write when he was in his 80’s — my dad sat me at the kitchen table with writing tablets and he gave me a pencil and handed one to my grandpa. We learned our letters and numbers together. My grandpa learned how to use the telephone and would call all his kids. He had their numbers written down with their names and it was his proudest moment to tell them he called them, and my dad didn’t have to dial for him. He was able to tell them he learned along with me.”

 

A picture of a person smiling, with dark hair and wearing glasses.

Artist Name: Angie Sierra
Department: N/A. Angie is a sister of Michelle Skalland, Clinical and Translational Research, Hola finance chair
Title of Art: “I Am Them, As They Are Me”
Art Media: Photography (above) and poem (below)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“My skin is cake
Dulce de leche, covered
With caramel and milk,
Mixed together into a delightful concoction.

The crown on top of my head
A lion’s mane of resilience, strength
Showing a history of power, beauty
One that is curly, coily
Wrapping around in a wonderful grasp of
grace and fluffiness
Soft, yet dangerous.

My thoughts and actions
Like spilled ink
Words traveling in astute patterns
Destructive if not controlled,
If not let out in a healthy manner,
Covering everything in its path with dark,
fluid liquid.

But, I can give you
A wonderful pen to change,
This estranged world by the minute,
And leave my dark mark
Where it’s needed.

A photo of a forest at sunset with the sun light coming through the leaves.

Artist Name: Joe Arredondo
Department: Voice Operations, Hola chair
Title of Art: “Simple Joy”
Art Media: Photography

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

From the artist: “A Texas sunset is my happy place and while the beauty of a West Texas sunset is unmatched, this was taken in the hills in Austin while enjoying a summer evening. The simple things like a sunset always bring me the greatest joy.”

A black and white photo of trees and undergrowth.

Artist Name: Joe Arredondo
Department: Voice Operations, Hola chair
Title of Art: “My Texas Roots”
Art Media: Photography

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

From the artist: “The photo was taken at a now dry lake in the panhandle of Texas between Herford and Amarillo. It is a bird sanctuary now and a place I enjoy stopping at to just sit and think. There are so few trees out in fields and pastures due to the winds that come across the plains, farming, and cattle ranching, however there is this random lake where bison are still ranched to help build the population. Trees in this part of Texas only survive because they have deep roots, and it reminds me of my family and the deep roots we have to Texas. They seem to have been bent from the wind, however they utilize each other at the same time as a support system which has always been why it is one of my favorite spots.”

 

A drawing of a girl with long hair, wearing a blue dress and with flowers around her.

Artist Name: Christian Hernandez
Department: N/A. Christian is the son of Maria Hernandez, Center Business Operations, Hola member
Title of Art: “Mi Hermanita” (“My Little Sister”)
Art Media: Portrait drawing

 

A drawing of a person showing the eyes and nose.

Artist Name: Christian Hernandez
Department: N/A. Christian is the son of Maria Hernandez, Center Business Operations, Hola member
Title of Art: “Untitled”
Art Media: Pencil sketch

 

A photo of a young person wearing make-up.

Artist Name: Maria Hernandez
Department: Center Business Operations, Hola member
Title of Art: “ColoRican Beauty”
Art Media: Portrait photo

 

From the artist: “I am a mom, administrator and photographer who loves doing portraits and family pictures. Photography has been a passion of mine since childhood, and I love capturing little moments of life.”

A photo of a rural house in Honduras with a girl sitting by the door and a boy walking in front of her.

Artist Name: Bessy Daigre
Department: Otolaryngology Admin, Hola member
Title of Art: “Honduras Small Village”
Art Media: Photography

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Photo of a young girl with hair to her shoulders wearing a white t-shirt and holding a bicycle tire. A wooden fence in the background.

Artist Name: Bessy Daigre
Department: Otolaryngology Admin, Hola member
Title of Art: “Young Girl”
Art Media: Photography

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Photo of a young girl smiling and hugging a stuffed animal.

Artist Name: Bessy Daigre
Department: Otolaryngology Admin, Hola member
Title of Art: “Happy Young Girl”
Art Media: Photography

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Photo of a string of peppers of many colors.

Artist Name: Bessy Daigre
Department: Otolaryngology Admin, Hola member
Title of Art: “Peppers”
Art Media: Photography

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A photo of an old stone church with green grass in the foreground and a blue sky in the background.

Artist Name: Bessy Daigre
Department: Otolaryngology Admin, Hola member
Title of Art: “18th Century Church Zapamatepe Village”
Art Media: Photography

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A collage of two photos showing Mayan ruins.

Artist Name: Bessy Daigre
Department: Otolaryngology Admin, Hola member
Title of Art: “Copan Mayan Ruins”
Art Media: Photography

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A photo showing the skyline of Seattle at dusk with some clouds in the sky.

Artist Name: Bessy Daigre
Department: Otolaryngology Admin, Hola member
Title of Art: “Space Needle”
Art Media: Photography

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A photo of a golden sunset with mountains and water visible in the foreground.

Artist Name: Bessy Daigre
Department: Otolaryngology Admin, Hola member
Title of Art: “Edmonds Sunset #1”
Art Media: Photography

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A photo of a golden sunset with the water reflecting the sunlight.

Artist Name: Bessy Daigre
Department: Otolaryngology Admin, Hola member
Title of Art: “Edmonds Sunset #2”
Art Media: Photography

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

From the artist: “I am from Olanchito, Yoro, a beautiful small town in the North of Honduras. Olanchito is also known as the Civic City. I grew up in a family of a single, hard-working mother and three sisters. Witnessing how hard my mother worked inspired me to study and graduate so I can help my mother and my sisters. I attended high school and a university in Honduras where I got my accounting and business management degree. Before joining Seattle Children’s Otolaryngology Division, I worked at the Community Health Center of Snohomish County as a medical receptionist and patient eligibility specialist. I used my native Spanish language to help many Latinx/Hispanic families in need of medical care. In my free time, I enjoy spending time with my husband and son. I also enjoy crafting jewelry and photography in addition to visiting new places. My advice to all the Latinx/Hispanic children is to “never give up hope.” Never allow anyone to stop you to follow your dreams. Remember you are our future, and you can help other people in need like the one in my pictures.”

Learn more

Review these links shared by the Hola Inclusion Network to discover how you and your family can learn more about Hispanic Heritage Month and what it represents throughout the year.