‘autism’

All Articles tagged ‘autism’

Finding My Village

Kristin Jarvis Adams (back right) found different forms of support when her son Andrew (bottom right) was diagnosed with autism, and then years later when he battled a rare immune disorder. Also pictured are her husband, Jon, and daughter, Hannah.

The proverb that suggests it takes a village to raise a child can be easily adapted for parents facing the various challenges that come with having a child with special needs and circumstances. Parents sometimes need the support of a village. Author Kristin Jarvis Adams shared her experiences with On the Pulse in finding her village when her son, Andrew, was diagnosed with autism and years later, when he was treated and overcame a rare immune disorder at Seattle Children’s and Seattle Cancer Care Alliance. Adams, who is a member of the Autism Center Guild at Seattle Children’s, tells her family’s story in her book The Chicken Who Saved Us: The Remarkable Story of Andrew and Frightful.

For 10 years my husband and I had been making trips to and from Seattle Children’s with our autistic son, Andrew, who suffered from an unheard of progressive inflammatory disease. Andrew had been in the hospital for months, his body riddled with gaping ulcers, his organs compromised by chronic inflammation. Now we were in the middle of chemotherapy and radiation treatments that were preparing him for an experimental bone marrow transplant. It was our last hope.

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Treating Patients With Autism in the Emergency Department

Dr. Eileen Klein, attending physician and co-director of Emergency Medicine Research, will speak about the challenges families and children with autism face in navigating the emergency department.

Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are becoming a larger proportion of Seattle Children’s patients, challenging providers to develop new tactics to meet their unique needs.

This year’s Pediatric Bioethics Conference, “Autism Re-examined: Ethical Challenges in Care, Support, Research and Inclusion,” will focus on the challenges and special requirements of treating these patients.

Dr. Eileen Klein, attending physician and co-director of Emergency Medicine Research at Seattle Children’s Hospital, is a featured speaker at this year’s conference. She gave On the Pulse a sneak preview of her presentation plans, what she’s most looking forward to and what she hopes to learn. Read full post »

Seattle Children’s Joins Largest Autism Research Study in U.S.

Dr. Raphael Bernier is helping launch a web-based registry with DNA analysis to accelerate autism research and speed discovery of treatments.

Dr. Raphael Bernier is helping launch a web-based registry with DNA analysis to accelerate autism research and speed discovery of treatments.

Researchers know that certain genes are linked to autism spectrum disorders — scientists have identified about 50 genes, and they estimate an additional 300 or more are also involved.

Pinpointing these genes is difficult, but it could be the key to understanding the cause of a disorder that affects 1 in every 68 children in the U.S., according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. One child’s diagnosis of autism and the gene that contributed to it will likely be completely different than another child’s diagnosis and genetic influences. Now, a nationwide study will create the largest bank of autism genes in the country that researchers can contribute to and use in research.

Seattle Children’s Autism Center is helping launch the web-based registry with DNA analysis to accelerate autism research and speed discovery of treatments. The SPARK study, sponsored by the Simons Foundation Autism Research Initiative, encompasses 21 leading national research institutions doing autism research.

“When we work to identify genes that cause autism, we need a huge number of individuals diagnosed with autism because each genetic event that leads to autism is rare,” said Dr. Raphael Bernier, a researcher and clinical director of Seattle Children’s Autism Center. “This large registry allows us to identify genetic trends. Once we know which genes to focus on, we can look at more individualized treatments for the future.” Read full post »