‘childhood obesity’

All Articles tagged ‘childhood obesity’

Bike Trains Shown to Increase Physical Activity Among Children

Children who participated in the bike train study averaged an additional 21 minutes of exercise per day and increased cycling to school by 45%.

The path to healthier living for children could be the same one they take to school.

Children who participated in adult-supervised group bicycle rides to and from school increased their moderate-to-vigorous physical activity by 21 minutes per day and daily cycling commutes by 45%, according to a pilot study recently published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

The additional exercise study participants gained from riding in the groups, known as bike trains, accounted for 35% of the 60 minutes of physical activity recommended daily for children.

“Regular physical activity can help build muscle and bone strength, raise energy levels, and help reduce the risk of conditions like obesity and heart disease,” said Seattle Children’s researcher Dr. Jason Mendoza, who served as the principal investigator for the study. Read full post »

NIH funds $2 million obesity treatment study at Seattle Children’s Research Institute

The SHIFT study is a great opportunity for families starting the New Year thinking about weight loss and healthy habits.

Many people begin the New Year with a commitment to better health and weight loss. At Seattle Children’s Research Institute, we’re doing the same by launching an obesity treatment study using long-term interventions that provide children and parents with focused guidance and education to help them reach and sustain weight loss goals.

The study, known as the SHIFT study (Success in Health: Impacting Families Together) takes place over a five-month period in which children ages 7-11 and their parents meet weekly for intensive sessions at regional clinics.

“This study is a great opportunity for one-on-one attention and group support for families who are starting this New Year thinking about weight loss and healthy habits,” said Dr. Brian Saelens, Principal Investigator and director of the study. “Past results using this intensive method showed promise, and we are excited to expand this research with NIH support.” Read full post »