The abnormality in Julia De Vos’ left eye was later identified as retinoblastoma. Julia’s mother, Amanda De Vos, took the photo and was quick to alert the family pediatrician when she noticed the white dot.

Some pictures are worth much more than a thousand words.

Like the picture Amanda De Vos took of her daughter Julia, which helped to identify retinoblastoma, a rare eye cancer that was stopped in its tracks with an innovative treatment at Seattle Children’s.

De Vos, a professional photographer, was reviewing shots she took of her 15-month-old identical twin daughters, Julia and Jemma, when a photo of Julia caught her attention. The image shows an excited toddler in dinosaur pajamas, her open mouth featuring three new bottom teeth.

An off-white glow in Julia’s left eye gave De Vos pause. It was an abnormality De Vos hadn’t seen previously in any of the thousands of pictures she had taken. The pupil in Julia’s right eye had a red dot in it—a common photographic nuisance that results when light from a camera flash reflects off the retina in the back of the eye. Read full post »