Health and Safety

All Articles in the Category ‘Health and Safety’

How to Start a Conversation About Suicide with Children and Teens, According to Experts

Every year, people around the country observe September as Suicide Prevention Awareness Month to shine a light on mental health care and bring awareness to suicide, a topic many find difficult to discuss.

Dr. Alysha Thompson, the clinical director and psychologist on the Psychiatry and Behavioral Medicine Unit (PBMU) at Seattle Children’s, shares ways that parents and caretakers can support children and teens, and enable families to engage in meaningful and supportive discussions about suicide together.

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New Bivalent COVID-19 Booster Shots Are Now Available at Seattle Children’s

Beginning today, Seattle Children’s is offering the new Pfizer COVID-19 bivalent vaccine booster. It will be available to patients, community members and workforce members.

We will begin offering the new bivalent Moderna vaccine booster later this week.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends the updated COVID-19 boosters from Pfizer-BioNTech for people ages 12 years and older and from Moderna for people ages 18 years and older.

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What Parents Should Know About Monkeypox

With cases of the monkeypox virus (MPV) being reported across the country, many parents have questions about how to keep their kids as safe as possible.

The MPV infection can cause an illness that includes rashes and other symptoms like fever, chills, headache and exhaustion, among others, and is passed by close, prolonged skin-to-skin contact. Pediatric cases are among a very small number of cases in the country and in general, children are at very low risk of getting monkeypox in their normal daily interactions, including at school.

Dr. Sara Vora, an infectious disease expert at Seattle Children’s, shares what parents should know about MPV and the measures they can take to reduce the risk of infection in children.

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Summer Heat Wave: Four Things Parents Should Always Keep in Mind

With a heat wave expected to impact Washington this week, many families across the state have health questions and concerns in mind.

Dr. Tony Woodward, medical director of emergency medicine at Seattle Children’s, provides the following advice for parents and caregivers about how to beat the heat as well as keep their kids safe this summer.

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5 Ways Parents and Caretakers Can Keep Children and Teens Safe in the Water

As warmer temperatures continue to increasingly draw crowds to the water, it’s important to keep safety in mind, especially when children and teens are involved.

Dr. Linda Quan, a pediatric emergency medicine physician at Seattle Children’s spoke with KUOW where she shared her five most valuable pieces of water safety advice for parents and caretakers.

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Pediatric Infectious Disease Doctors Answer Parent’s Most Common Questions about Vaccines Under 5

Children between the age of 6 months and 4 years old are now eligible to receive the COVID-19 vaccine. For families who have long awaited the opportunity to vaccinate this age group, it’s a sigh of relief.

“It provides another layer of protection that we have been seeking for a long time now,” parent Michael Bamshad told KOMO news while attending Seattle Children’s vaccine clinic with his 4-year-old daughter Marlowe. “Everyone else has had the opportunity to get vaccinated and now it’s time for kids under five.”

For other parents with babies and toddlers, many are wondering what side effects to look out for with smaller children who cannot yet verbalize how they feel post-shot.

To help answer the most common vaccine questions, Dr. Surabhi (Sara) Vora, an Associate Professor of Pediatric Infectious Diseases and an Infectious Disease Physician at Seattle Children’s and Dr. Janet Englund, a Professor of Pediatrics and Infectious Disease Specialist at Seattle Children’s shared some expert insight.

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Vaccines Are Now Available for Kids Under 5

On June 21, Seattle Children’s became one of the first locations in the country to offer COVID-19 vaccinations to children ages 6 months to 4 years old.

This was a day that Seattle Children’s staff has long worked toward, as Seattle Children’s doctors were also involved clinical trial research for COVID-19 vaccines for this age group. For children in the 6 months – 4-year-old age group, our COVID-19 vaccine clinical trial spots were highly sought after, with thousands of applicants for approximately 100 slots at Seattle Children’s.

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Seattle Children’s Partners with Community to Turn Heartbreak into Action

Over the past eight years, Seattle Children’s has worked diligently across Washington to protect youth from firearm tragedies and improve safe firearm storage practices

Lara Sim, Seattle Children’s Director of Community Health and Isabell Sakamoto, Program Manager of Suicide and Injury Prevention at Children’s bring you this post as part of our Keeping Kids Healthy efforts.

Content warning: In support of trauma-informed communications, please be aware that this message contains topics that may be activating for survivors of gun violence and those who have been impacted by it. Support yourself and loved ones–emotional and crisis support services are available to anyone.

In recent days, communities across the country have been squarely reminded that gun violence is a public health crisis for our children and their families. As we sit at the intersection of these tragedies stemming from deep rooted issues like racism and gun violence, we not only mourn the victims but join in the grief unleashed by these tragedies; we share our condolences with all who have been impacted.

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The flu shot: Questions and answers for parents

Dr. Annika Hofstetter and  Dr. Matthew Kronman spoke with On the Pulse to answer questions parents may have about the flu vaccine this year.

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Tips for In-person School Success from an Educator and Dad

Seattle Children’s Education Department provides free services for students who will be in the hospital for at least one week. The teachers are certified by the state of Washington in both general and special education. They’re experts at supporting kids and their families when children and teens are suddenly out of school and as they transition back into school after an extended absence. Scott Hampton, manager of K-12 Education Services and father of three, sat down with On the Pulse to share advice to support families in the community as they settle back into in-person learning in this new school year. Read full post »