Meet the Medical Directors of Odessa Brown Children’s Clinic: Dr. Christen Manangan

A three-part series featuring the medical directors at OBCC focused on integrating care and building community together

Christen Nicole Manangan, PHD

This is part three of a three-part series. In prior weeks, On the Pulse featured Dr. Kenisha Campbell and Dr. Kari Sims.

 

As a Pacific Northwest native, Dr. Christen Manangan always dreamed of working in the Seattle area.

“Seattle has always been my home,” Dr. Manangan said. “My hope, my dream, was always to serve the Seattle community.”

She joined the Odessa Brown Children’s Clinic (OBCC) nearly six years ago as the Behavioral Health Director and said she feels honored to be a leader at a clinic with such an exciting future ahead.

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Meet the Medical Directors of Odessa Brown Children’s Clinic: Dr. Kari Sims

A three-part series featuring the medical directors at OBCC focused on integrating care and building community together

Kari Ann Sims, DDS, MSD

This is part two of a three-part series. Last week, Dr. Kenisha Campbell was featured. Next week, On the Pulse introduces Dr. Christen Manangan.

When Dr. Kari Sims walks through the clinic doors of Seattle Children’s Odessa Brown Children’s Clinic (OBCC) everyday, she’s inspired by the patients and staff.

“I knew OBCC was a special place,” Dr. Sims said. “I was thrilled to have the opportunity to stay at OBCC after residency.”

Dr. Sims joined OBCC as a University of Washington pediatric dental resident and later came on board as a per diem dentist in 2014. She was appointed the dental director of OBCC in 2019 as the new Othello clinic location was taking root. From vision boards to seeing the doors open for the first time, Dr. Sims viewed it as a tremendous gift to be a part of the project and help make an impact on how the clinic would come to fruition.

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Meet the Medical Directors of Odessa Brown Children’s Clinic: Dr. Kenisha Campbell

A three-part series featuring the medical directors at OBCC focused on integrating care and building community together

Kenisha Natalie Campbell, MD

This is part one of a three-part series. Next week, meet Dr. Kari Sims and Dr. Christen Manangan.

Dr. Kenisha Campbell is the medical director of Clinical Operations at Seattle Children’s Odessa Brown Children’s Clinic (OBCC) and is one of the three leaders dedicated to providing equitable pediatric care to current and future generations.

As medical director of OBCC’s two locations in the Central District and Othello Square, Dr. Campbell is passionate about improving the standard of care and quality of life of the broader community, especially vulnerable populations.

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Ellie Found Her Calling and Is Racing Toward Her Dream

Ellie Musgrave, who dreams of becoming a professional race car driver one day, had emergency surgery at Seattle Children’s to remove a brain tumor at a young age.

Ellie Musgrave found her calling when she was 4 years old. Her father took her to the racetrack and a dream sparked. She surprised her dad by saying, “I want to do that.”

Much like the electrical charge that brings a car to life, the draw to racing happened in an instant and throttled her into motion. It was in the sound of engines, the whooshing of the cars as they sped by on the track.

That’s when she knew she wanted to be a race car driver.

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“I’ll Have Scars, Too”: A Father-Son Bond More Than Skin Deep

A few weeks after Ryder Gordon’s first surgery at Seattle Children’s, Thomas Gordon went to the tattoo shop and got an exact replica of his son’s scar on his neck and chest.

When Ryder Gordon was 2 years old, he underwent his first surgery. It took 12 hours and saved his life.

Thomas Gordon and his wife, Magi, vividly remember the day they handed over their son to surgeons at Seattle Children’s.

“It was gut-wrenching,” said Magi. “You want more than anything to switch places with your child.”

Ryder was the couple’s first child and they never imagined being thrust into a world of comprehensive medical care. But there they were, among the bright lights of the surgical suites and the bustling halls of the hospital.

“Going through a medical journey really humbles you,” added Magi. “Being at Seattle Children’s brought us a sense of comfort. I felt like they cared about us, not just as patients, but as people.”

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Helping Children and Teens Cope with Anxiety

Kendra L. Read, PhD, Attending Psychologist, Seattle Children’s

The pandemic has been difficult for many of us, especially for children and teens. Not only are children grappling with the challenges that naturally occur during formative years, but the weight of recent events has exacerbated mental health issues. At alarming rates, youth are reporting feelings of depression and anxiety. Read full post »

Seattle Children’s Athletic Trainers Help High School Athletes Thrive

Picture of Seth Wayne smiling.

Seth Wayne is a Seattle Children’s athletic trainer at Evergreen High School.

Did you know March is National Athletic Training Month? In recognition of Seattle Children’s incredible athletic trainers, we’re highlighting the tremendous role they play in helping athletes thrive on and off the field.

Across the greater Puget Sound region, nearly 50 athletic trainers from Seattle Children’s are embedded in 42 schools from Tacoma to Woodinville. They are with athletes at least five days a week – on the sidelines at games when most injuries occur, as well as in the gym or training facilities during practice. They provide sport-specific training and conditioning programs, as well as injury care for high school athletes. Athletic trainers help care for athletes from a wide array of sports, including football, soccer, lacrosse, gymnastics, wrestling, basketball, baseball, softball, track and field, tennis, golf, swimming, volleyball, cross country and roller derby. From helping tape ankles to suggesting specific exercises to decrease the risk of injury to communicating with orthopedic providers when catastrophic injuries occur, athletic trainers help support young athletes.

“We are the eyes, hands and ears of the care team and a liaison between the providers and patient,” said Seth Wayne, a Seattle Children’s athletic trainer at Evergreen High School.

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New Hip Preservation Program at Seattle Children’s Aims to Help Children and Young Adults With Hip Issues

A man smiling and looking at the camera.

Dr. Todd Blumberg is the program director of Seattle Children’s Child and Young Adult Hip Preservation Program.

Dr. Todd Blumberg, program director of Seattle Children’s Child and Young Adult Hip Preservation Program, has helped build a new program that is truly one-of-a-kind in the Pacific Northwest. The program offers comprehensive and complete care for children, teens and young adults with a wide range of hip conditions.

Blumberg was born and raised in Texas. He graduated from medical school at Baylor College of Medicine. He completed his orthopedic surgery training at the University of Washington and then went on to complete pediatric orthopedic fellowship training at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, with additional fellowship training in hip preservation surgery at Boston Children’s Hospital.

We sat down with Blumberg to learn more about the program and his vision for helping children with hip issues live their most fulfilling life possible.

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Dr. Kevin Koo’s Relentless Pursuit of Innovation Helps Children on Dialysis Find More Freedom

A man smiling and wearing a suit and tie

Dr. Kevin Koo is an interventional radiologist at Seattle Children’s.

When a child is diagnosed with kidney failure, it can feel daunting and surreal. Often, patients feel like their life is put on hold. A child whose kidneys do not work normally may need dialysis to filter waste and extra fluids from the blood and, for those who suffer from kidney failure, dialysis is required. Dialysis is a lifesaving treatment, but it is also life-altering. Patients who need dialysis are on hemodialysis three to five times a week, a total of up to 12 to 20 hours per week.

Dialysis is a lifeline and bridge for many waiting for a kidney transplant, but it can take months or even years before an organ is available.

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The Race to Save Sirish’s Brain

A smiling family of two parents and three children posing for the camera with a white background.

Sirish, pictured in the top row on the left with his family, unexpectedly began developing seizures at age 11. Learn how teams at Seattle Children’s helped to protect his brain.

Sirish was a healthy, happy boy with no underlying medical conditions aside from food allergies and eczema, both of which were easily managed at home.

Then one day, he spiked a fever.

Initially, his mother, Jyothi, a physician who previously practiced in India, wasn’t concerned. The fever broke, and Sirish seemed to improve.

About a week later, though, he spiked another fever. This time, medication didn’t help. Then, the unimaginable happened: he had a seizure.

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