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Care Close to Home Gives Carson Ability to Pursue Her Creativity

Carson Bryant, an 11-year-old from Gig Harbor, Washington, was diagnosed with Crohn’s disease. Through the Inflammatory Bowel Disease Center at Seattle Children’s South Clinic in Federal Way, Carson is able to receive the treatment she needs much closer to home.

Creativity is at the center of 11-year-old Carson Bryant’s life.

“I would describe her as being imaginative,” her mother, Andrea Bryant, said. “She has a love for theater and dreams of being an illustrator someday.”

In January 2018, Carson had to put her creative passions aside when she began experiencing symptoms that sparked concern for her mother.

“I noticed Carson was making frequent trips to the bathroom,” she said. “I became even more worried when there was blood in her stool.”

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Sewing a Seamless Transition for Chester’s Autism Care

Chester Dudley was diagnosed with autism at 5 years old. When he reached his late teens, his mother had growing concern about the resources that would be available for him once he entered adulthood. Fortunately, Seattle Children’s Alyssa Burnett Adult Life Center made the transition for Chester easier.

When Chester Dudley was 3 years old, his mother, Stella Ogiale, enrolled him into a child care center located near their home in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

After a few months, Ogiale received a startling message from the center telling her that there might be something wrong with Chester.

“They told me I needed to get him checked,” Ogiale said. “When I heard that, I became so emotional and upset that I stopped taking him there.”

She thought her son’s hyperactive behavior was like any other child’s, but to give her peace of mind, she decided to have him evaluated.

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Mother of Twins with Autism Shares Her Gratitude to Care Team

In honor of Autism Awareness Month, On the Pulse shares a story about a mother with 3-year-old twin daughters who have autism and her showing of gratitude for the relentless care and support that the Seattle Children’s Autism Center staff has provided her family.

Nataly Cuzcueta felt like a proud parent when she witnessed her twin daughters, Kira and Aliya, smile, laugh and walk for the first time.

Seeing them reach these milestones left no doubt in Cuzcueta’s mind that their development was right on track.

However, when her daughters turned 11 months old, everything changed.

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How to Address Sexual Abuse With Children and Teens

With stories of sexual abuse perpetrated by public figures continuing to be in the spotlight, as well as the rise of the #MeToo movement, there is a growing need for parents and caregivers to educate children and teens about the difficult topic of sexual abuse.

According to RAINN (Rape, Abuse & Incest National Network), every 92 seconds a person in the U.S. is sexually assaulted. Every 9 minutes, that victim is a child.

“Before the age of 18, one in every four girls and one in every six boys will be sexually abused,” said Dr. Lynda Lee Carlisle, a psychiatrist and trauma specialist from Seattle Children’s Psychiatry and Behavioral Medicine clinic. “While it can happen to any child, those most vulnerable are intellectually disabled or identify as LGBTQ+.”

Sexual abuse is rarely committed by a stranger. It is often by someone who the child knows and trusts. While some may think sexual abuse only involves physical contact, it can also be done without contact in the form of inappropriate photos or videos, exposure or other behavior.

“We commonly see children abused by a family member,” said Dr. Carole Jenny, child abuse fellowship director of Seattle Children’s Protection Program (SCAN). “It is also more likely to occur in blended families, with the abuser being a step-parent or a parent’s boyfriend or girlfriend.”

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Visually Impaired Parents Prove There Are No Limits to Care

Ruth, 3, was diagnosed with a rare gastrointestinal disorder. Despite having a blind mother and partially sighted father, Ruth’s parents proved it was possible to learn the complicated skills that were required to manage her health at home.

For many parents, caring for a child with a serious medical condition can have its challenges.

For Hailee and Ray Hughes, the challenge of caring for their 3-year-old daughter, Ruth, who has a rare gastrointestinal disorder, meant learning complicated skills like how to maintain Ruth’s nutritional needs intravenously through a tube connected to her chest.

“It definitely wasn’t easy at first,” said Hughes. “There was a lot to learn and we wanted to safely care for our daughter in the best way we could.”

Learning the proper techniques involved in Ruth’s care was one thing, but doing it with partial to no vision was another.

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Twin Holds on to Life to Celebrate First Birthday With Sister

Amani Jackson and her identical twin sister, Amira, possess a rare bond that began in their mother’s womb.

Up until the moment they were born, grasping on to one another, their bond remained unbroken.

It wasn’t until surgeons noticed one of them wasn’t quite like the other, that they needed to part ways.

“Although they were both premature, Amira came out healthy as can be,” said their mother, Stranje Pittman. “However, as soon as the doctor saw Amani, they knew something was wrong. Before I knew it, she was rushed out of the operating room and immediately taken to Seattle Children’s.”

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Patients Share Their Top Resolutions to Ring in the New Year

With the countdown to the New Year almost here, On the Pulse caught up with a few of the patients who inspired our readers with their stories throughout 2018. Below, they offer their hopes, dreams and goals for the year to come.

A shoulder above his cancer, Miguel sets sights on giving back

Miguel Navarro, 19, is focused on the road ahead after treatment for a rare bone cancer.

In 2018, doctors built a right shoulder for Miguel Navarro, 19, after surgically removing an aggressive type of bone cancer known as osteosarcoma that threatened his life. Miguel spent most of the last semester of his senior year of high school in the hospital going through chemotherapy and intensive rehabilitation to regain the use of his right arm. Now, he’s solely focused on the road ahead – one that includes getting back to a hobby he’s passionate about – driving his stick shift car – and giving back to others.

“My goal for 2019 is to give back to the community that took care of me and supported me during my time of need,” Miguel said. “I’m blessed to be alive. Now, I want to be hope for someone else.” Read full post »

Therapy Dog Lee Roy Brings ‘Howliday’ Joy to Families

Lee Roy, a 12-year-old miniature dachshund, has been volunteering as a therapy dog at Seattle Children’s for over a decade. He loves the holiday season, says his owner and handler, Gordon Knight.

A few little jingles from a furry friend can go a long way during the holiday season at Seattle Children’s.

Lee Roy, a 12-year-old miniature dachshund, can be seen trotting down the halls of the hospital in festive attire made complete with tiny bells that announce his delivery of warm cuddles to patients.

“Lee Roy loves the holidays,” said his owner and handler, Gordon Knight. “It’s almost like he knows it’s an extra special time to spread cheer to patients and their families.”

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Sam Shares His Struggle With OCD Through Candid Melodies

Sam Foster, 19, has struggled with obsessive compulsive disorder for most of his life. At first he felt ashamed of it, until he began expressing himself through music and underwent intensive treatment at Seattle Children’s. Photo credit: Christopher Nelson

When Sam Foster steps onstage, guitar in hand, he lights up the room with his confident presence.

Yet behind his poised demeanor is a painful truth that begins to unravel as he lets his lyrics flow through the microphone.

Sam has battled with obsessive compulsive disorder, or OCD, most of his life.

According to the National Institute of Mental Health, OCD is a common, chronic and long-lasting disorder. It occurs when a person has uncontrollable, reoccurring thoughts, known as obsessions, and behaviors that they feel the urge to repeat over and over, known as compulsions.

In response to the social stigma that often surrounds mental health disorders, Sam initially felt ashamed of having OCD. That was, until he began expressing himself through writing music and eventually got the treatment he desperately needed.

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Zack Finds His Beat Amidst a Life Full of Challenges

For 13-year-old Zack Edge, playing the drums came naturally ever since he laid his eyes on his very first drum set at 3 years old.

Yet other parts of Zack’s life didn’t come so naturally, such as his ability to stand or walk.

“Zack was born with cerebral palsy,” said his mother Sara Edge, “and over the course of his short lifetime he’s gone through a lot and has had to overcome so much.”

Cerebral palsy (CP) is a condition that affects muscle movement. The muscles of some children with CP are stiff and rigid, which is called spasticity that leads to stiffness in the muscle and joints causing movement to be very difficult.

“It wasn’t until we went to Seattle Children’s that Zack’s life completely changed,” said Edge.

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