Cancer and Research

All Articles in the Category ‘Cancer and Research’

Leader in Pediatric Oncology Receives National Honor from American Cancer Society

Dr. Abby R. Rosenberg, director of the Palliative Care and Resilience lab at the Seattle Children’s Research Institute

Dr. Abby R. Rosenberg, director of the Palliative Care and Resilience (PCAR) lab at the Seattle Children’s Research Institute (SCRI); an associate professor of pediatric hematology/oncology at the University of Washington (UW); director of pediatrics at the UW Cambia Palliative Care Center of Excellence; and director of survivorship and outcomes research in pediatric oncology at the UW, has been awarded the 2021 Trish Greene Quality of Life Award by the American Cancer Society (ACS).

The prestigious award was presented to Dr. Rosenberg in an intimate ceremony in Seattle Children’s new Forest B building and honors those who have dedicated their career to research that improves the quality of life for cancer patients and their families.

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Seattle Children’s Opens New “Forest B” Building

New “Forest B” Building Features More In-Patient and Operating Rooms, Cancer and Blood Disorders Care Facilities and more

On June 1st, Seattle Children’s opens the latest addition to the hospital campus — a building called “Forest B.”  Forest B is a project over 10 years in the making and will add an additional 310,000 square feet of space to the hospital campus.  

“Forest B is a critical addition to Seattle Children’s, given our region’s incredible historic and anticipated growth,” said Mandy Hansen, senior director of planning, design, and construction at Seattle Children’s. “The building gives our care teams the space they need to provide lifesaving and life-changing treatments, surgeries and procedures to even more patients in the coming years. The thoughtful design will also help us integrate more of our breakthrough research into the clinical care environment as we tirelessly work toward cures.”  Read full post »

Seattle Children’s Therapeutics Announces Expansive Collaboration with Cellevolve to Advance Research for Childhood Brain Cancers

Seattle Children’s Therapeutics, a venture at Seattle Children’s, bringing cutting edge, curative technologies and therapies to defeat pediatric cancer and other diseases that impact children, today announced a collaboration with Cellevolve Bio, a development and commercialization company focused on cell therapies, aimed at developing and commercializing a suite of novel multiplex chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) for the treatment of pediatric central nervous system (CNS) malignancies.

Under the exclusive agreement, Seattle Children’s Therapeutics will conduct early-stage and pre-clinical discovery, and Phase 1 clinical trial development. Cellevolve will lead Phase 2 and subsequent clinical development with key Seattle Children’s Therapeutics involvement. Read full post »

Seattle Children’s Research Division: Celebrating 15 Years of Innovation

For the past 15 years, Seattle Children’s Research Division has been at the forefront of breakthrough innovations. From new drugs to treat cystic fibrosis, to first-in-the-nation use of laser ablation for epilepsy and brain tumors to remove unwanted cells, the research division is advancing our mission to provide hope, care and cures to help every child live the healthiest and most fulfilling life possible.

Here, we take a look at some of the achievements of the past decade-and-a-half.

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The Largest Medulloblastoma Trial Makes Monumental Strides Forward for Cancer Research, Increases Survival in Children by 19 Percent

Sammy Loch began experiencing debilitating headaches in 2009. She was a sophomore in high school at the time. When she went to see her primary care provider, they diagnosed her with migraines and prescribed medication to help dull the pain. When her migraines persisted, her doctor recommended Loch get an MRI to rule out anything more insidious.

Days before the MRI, Loch got dressed in a beautiful purple gown, her curly hair bounding in tight curls just at her shoulders. She had been looking forward to the homecoming dance for weeks. She was all smiles, but the throbbing pain in her head was still there. She powered through the dance, determined to have fun. She was completely unaware her world would soon be turned upside down as she danced in the high school gym surrounded by her friends.

On Tuesday, Oct 27, 2009, Loch went in for an MRI.

“The technician was so bubbly and nice,” Loch said. “She told me about the elaborate costume she was working on because Halloween was only a few days away. I remember everything about her demeanor changed when she came back in the room after my scan. My heart sank. I knew something was seriously wrong.”

That night around 8 p.m., her family got a call. Her mother answered, repeating aloud what the voice on the other end of the line was saying. “There’s a mass. You need to go to Seattle Children’s as soon as possible.”

Everything seemed to stop as those words hung heavy in the air.

“It’s cancer,” Loch said. “I just knew it.”

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