Research

All Articles in the Category ‘Research’

Clinical Trial Offers Only Treatment Option for Girl with Hepatitis B

Esmee and Willa

Esmee (left) and Willa (right) pose for a photo.

A clinical trial was the only hope for Esmee, a little girl adopted from China. Read below about her story and the innovative research being done at Seattle Children’s Hospital and Research Institute to help those who would otherwise have no treatment option for chronic hepatitis B (HBV).

Renee Jones always wanted a little girl, so when the adoption agency called one day to tell Jones about Esmee and Willa, she was thrilled – two little girls instead of one!

She filed the paperwork for adoption and waited patiently to hear back. Read full post »

Research Finds Preschoolers Need More Opportunities for Active Play

outdoor playThe early childhood years are crucial for learning and development which should always involve a great deal of outdoor physical activity and playtime, but new research shows that’s not always the case. Results from a two-year study published today in Pediatrics show that children in daycares and preschools were presented with only 48 minutes of opportunities for physically active play per day — significantly less than what’s recommended. The National Association for Sport and Physical Education and Let’s Move! Child Care recommend that children should receive at least 120 minutes of active play time daily, including child-led free play and teacher-led play. Read full post »

Promising Research Trials Find New Combination of Drugs Treat Underlying Cause of Most Common Form of Cystic Fibrosis

Dr. Bonnie Ramsey, director of the Center for Clinical and Translational Research at Seattle Children’s Research Institute and professor at the University of Washington

Dr. Bonnie Ramsey, director of the Center for Clinical and Translational Research at Seattle Children’s Research Institute and professor of Pediatrics at the University of Washington

Results from two phase 3 clinical trials published yesterday in the New England Journal of Medicine show that a new combination of medications can successfully treat the underlying cause of cystic fibrosis for patients age 12 and older with two copies of the F508del gene mutation – the most common form of the life-threatening, genetic disease found in over half of the cystic fibrosis (CF) population. Approximately 8,500 people in the U.S., and 22,000 people in North America, Europe and Australia, age 12 and older with cystic fibrosis carry this gene mutation.

The international trial, which studied more than 1,000 cystic fibrosis patients age 12 and older, revealed that a combination of the drugs Kalydeco (ivacaftor) and lumacaftor, an experimental drug that has not yet been approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), successfully treated the defective CF protein and improved lung function. The drugs also helped patients achieve a 40 percent reduction in pulmonary exacerbations, the leading cause of death in cystic fibrosis patients. Read full post »

Family Genetics Study Reveals New Clues to Autism Risk

Dr. Raphael Bernier

Dr. Raphael Bernier

Dr. Raphael Bernier, clinical director of the Autism Center and investigator in the Center for Child Health, Behavior and Development at Seattle Children’s Research Institute has continued his quest to identify genetic mutations that are linked to autism. In a new paper published in Nature Genetics, Bernier and his collaborators at the University of Washington discovered evidence that some children with autism were more likely to have inherited gene mutations most often occurring from mothers to sons.

On the Pulse sat down with Bernier to learn more about these exciting findings. Read full post »

Meet Our New CEO, Dr. Jeff Sperring

Seattle Children's new CEO, Dr. Jeff Sperring

Seattle Children’s new CEO, Dr. Jeff Sperring

This week, the next chapter of Seattle Children’s journey begins with the arrival of our new CEO, Dr. Jeff Sperring. Even though it’s his first week on the job, he is no stranger to leading a world-class pediatric hospital. Sperring most recently served as president and CEO of Riley Hospital for Children at Indiana University Health, one of the largest children’s hospitals in the U.S. He was at Riley since 2002 and also served as Riley’s chief medical officer, associate chief medical officer and director of pediatric hospital medicine.

Sperring earned his medical degree from Vanderbilt University School of Medicine and was a pediatric resident at the Naval Medical Center San Diego. After residency, he served as a United States Navy Medical Corps officer in Twentynine Palms, Calif., for three years. Read full post »

Abnormal Genes Could Indicate Susceptibility for Kawasaki Disease, New Study Suggests

Dr. Michael Portman

Dr. Michael Portman

Abnormal genes found in Kawasaki disease patients could pave the way for early detection and treatment of not only Kawasaki disease but also many other inflammatory diseases such as psoriasis and multiple sclerosis (MS), according to a study recently published in the International Journal of Immunogenetics.

The study, titled “Imputation of class I and II HLA loci using high-density SNPs from ImmunoChip and their associations with Kawasaki disease in family-based study,” looked at blood and saliva DNA samples provided by 112 Kawasaki disease patients and their biological parents. The goal of the study was to identify possible genetic mutations, said author Dr. Michael Portman, a Seattle Children’s Hospital cardiologist and member of the Center for Developmental Therapeutics at Seattle Children’s Research Institute. Read full post »

Seattle Children’s Researchers to Present at Pediatric Academic Societies Annual Meeting

Dr. Megan Moreno (top) and Dr. Annika Hofstetter (bottom)

Dr. Megan Moreno (top) and Dr. Annika Hofstetter (bottom)

Seattle Children’s has the honor of having over 100 doctors and researchers slated to present at the 2015 Pediatric Academic Societies (PAS) Annual Meeting. This is the largest international meeting focused on children’s health research and clinical implications.

On the Pulse is highlighting two Seattle Children’s researchers who will be presenting their exciting new research: Dr. Megan Moreno and Dr. Annika Hofstetter.

Using media to understand mechanisms of behavior change

Dr. Megan Moreno of Seattle Children’s Center for Child Health and Behavioral Development is leading the way in adolescent social media (SM) use research. In her PAS presentation she will highlight key adolescent health issues pertaining to the SM landscape.

Over 90 percent of adolescents use SM, where they may display risky behaviors and describe their health attitudes, intentions and behaviors in ways that can be measured, Moreno said. Read full post »

Fighting a Nameless Battle, Racing for Research

Alyssa Bowen

Alyssa Bowen

Alyssa Bowen appears to be an average 15-year-old on the outside, but inside, her body is fighting a civil war. Her immune system is hyperactive, creating antibodies to attack her own blood cells, platelets, white blood cells and tissues. Despite the extensive efforts of doctors and nurses, they have not been able to offer Alyssa an exact diagnosis.

Alyssa has been coming to Seattle Children’s Hospital from a very young age. She has had many hospitalizations and a variety medications and treatments to help her manage her puzzling condition and the pain associated with it. Read full post »

Research Continues to Disprove Link Between Autism and Vaccines

King_Bryan_Small

Dr. Bryan King worries that each time the media includes the MMR vaccine and autism in the same sentence, even if reporting the lack of association, the false idea of a linkage between the two is perpetuated.

A significant body of validated research over the last 15 years has found no link between the measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine and autism spectrum disorders, yet the false myth that this vaccine may cause or intensify the disorder continues to circulate among some families of children with autism. As a result, some parents delay or forgo the life-saving MMR vaccine for their children.

A new study, led by The Lewin Group and titled “Autism Occurrence by MMR Vaccine Status Among U.S. Children With Older Siblings With and Without Autism,” has been published this week in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA). This study further refuted the concern that children who are at higher risk of developing autism could be negatively impacted by the MMR vaccine. The study included approximately 95,000 children with older siblings and found that receipt of the MMR vaccine was not associated with an increased risk of autism, regardless of whether older siblings had autism.

Dr. Bryan King, director of Seattle Children’s Autism Center and Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Medicine at Seattle Children’s Hospital and an investigator in Seattle Children’s Research Institute’s Center for Child Health, Behavior and Development, has written an editorial published in the same JAMA issue addressing this research and the controversies that surround it. On the Pulse sat down with King to learn more about these important issues. Read full post »

A Tribute to Our CEO, Dr. Tom Hansen

On May 1, Dr. Tom Hansen will step down as Seattle Children’s CEO after 10 years of service. During his leadership, Hansen was known as a visionary with big ideas – big ideas that helped us become one of the best children’s hospitals in the world while getting us closer than ever to achieving our goal of eliminating pediatric disease.

In May, Hansen will pass the CEO baton to Dr. Jeff Sperring, but he has no plans to stop innovating on behalf of Seattle Children’s. He will be returning to his research roots full time, continuing to pursue his passion of helping improve outcomes for premature infants as an investigator at Seattle Children’s Research Institute. In his research, he will focus on the development of low-cost ventilators for premature infants born in low- and middle-income countries. Read full post »