Research

All Articles in the Category ‘Research’

Preserving Hope for Young Cancer Patients to Have Families in the Future

Shannon Keating had to think about fertility preservation before she began treatment for Hodgkin lymphoma.

Family planning is not the first thing a young, newly diagnosed cancer patient might think about. But for adolescents and young adults facing cancer treatment that could leave them infertile, preserving the ability to have babies should be part of the conversation at the doctor’s office.

A new study published today in Cancer and led by Dr. Margarett Shnorhavorian, a pediatric urologist and researcher at the Seattle Children’s Research Institute Center for Clinical and Translational Research, found a need for increased awareness of fertility preservation for young cancer patients. The study was based on 459 adolescents and young adults who were diagnosed with cancer in 2007 or 2008. The patients were aged 15 to 39 years when diagnosed with germ cell tumor, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, Hodgkin lymphoma, acute lymphocytic leukemia, or sarcoma. Read full post »

Sharing Medical Decisions with Parents and Patients: Crucial with Caveats

ThinkstockPhotos-78459865In the doctor’s office, words matter. The content of a conversation between doctor, patient and parent can change the course of treatment. Shared decision-making has emerged as the dominant model in medicine for these conversations. There is even evidence it can improve patient outcomes. But should doctors reconsider its constant use? Shared decision-making and its boundaries will be the subject of a discussion led by Dr. Douglas Opel at the 11th annual Pediatric Bioethics Conference, which is being held July 24-25 at the Bell Harbor International Conference Center in Seattle.

Opel, a faculty member at the Treuman Katz Center for Pediatric Bioethics at Seattle Children’s and a general pediatrician at Seattle Children’s, sat down with On the Pulse to discuss the concept of shared decision-making. Read full post »

Seattle Children’s Offers Summer Scholars Program for Underserved Teens

summer scholars 2

The attendees of the summer scholars program visiting Pike Place Market.

Most teens aren’t keen on spending summer days in camp; they’ve outgrown sleeping bags and roasting s’mores. That’s why the Social Media and Adolescent Health Research Team (SMAHRT) at Seattle Children’s Research Institute is hosting this week a summer scholars program designed to help teens create their own research projects on teen health and media.

Led by Dr. Megan Moreno, principal investigator of the SMAHRT team, the summer scholars program will ask 25 teens ages 16-18, mostly from the Kent and Highline school districts, to help design and answer their own research questions such as:

  • How does Instagram affect adolescents’ well-being?
  • Can you be addicted to the Internet?
  • Does Facebook influence health behaviors for college students?

The students will also learn about different types of research that seek to improve child and adolescent health while experiencing different paths to a career in research or healthcare. Read full post »

Clinical Trial Offers Only Treatment Option for Girl with Hepatitis B

Esmee and Willa

Esmee (left) and Willa (right) pose for a photo.

A clinical trial was the only hope for Esmee, a little girl adopted from China. Read below about her story and the innovative research being done at Seattle Children’s Hospital and Research Institute to help those who would otherwise have no treatment option for chronic hepatitis B (HBV).

Renee Jones always wanted a little girl, so when the adoption agency called one day to tell Jones about Esmee and Willa, she was thrilled – two little girls instead of one!

She filed the paperwork for adoption and waited patiently to hear back. Read full post »

Research Finds Preschoolers Need More Opportunities for Active Play

outdoor playThe early childhood years are crucial for learning and development which should always involve a great deal of outdoor physical activity and playtime, but new research shows that’s not always the case. Results from a two-year study published today in Pediatrics show that children in daycares and preschools were presented with only 48 minutes of opportunities for physically active play per day — significantly less than what’s recommended. The National Association for Sport and Physical Education and Let’s Move! Child Care recommend that children should receive at least 120 minutes of active play time daily, including child-led free play and teacher-led play. Read full post »

Promising Research Trials Find New Combination of Drugs Treat Underlying Cause of Most Common Form of Cystic Fibrosis

Dr. Bonnie Ramsey, director of the Center for Clinical and Translational Research at Seattle Children’s Research Institute and professor at the University of Washington

Dr. Bonnie Ramsey, director of the Center for Clinical and Translational Research at Seattle Children’s Research Institute and professor of Pediatrics at the University of Washington

Results from two phase 3 clinical trials published yesterday in the New England Journal of Medicine show that a new combination of medications can successfully treat the underlying cause of cystic fibrosis for patients age 12 and older with two copies of the F508del gene mutation – the most common form of the life-threatening, genetic disease found in over half of the cystic fibrosis (CF) population. Approximately 8,500 people in the U.S., and 22,000 people in North America, Europe and Australia, age 12 and older with cystic fibrosis carry this gene mutation.

The international trial, which studied more than 1,000 cystic fibrosis patients age 12 and older, revealed that a combination of the drugs Kalydeco (ivacaftor) and lumacaftor, an experimental drug that has not yet been approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), successfully treated the defective CF protein and improved lung function. The drugs also helped patients achieve a 40 percent reduction in pulmonary exacerbations, the leading cause of death in cystic fibrosis patients. Read full post »

Family Genetics Study Reveals New Clues to Autism Risk

Dr. Raphael Bernier

Dr. Raphael Bernier

Dr. Raphael Bernier, clinical director of the Autism Center and investigator in the Center for Child Health, Behavior and Development at Seattle Children’s Research Institute has continued his quest to identify genetic mutations that are linked to autism. In a new paper published in Nature Genetics, Bernier and his collaborators at the University of Washington discovered evidence that some children with autism were more likely to have inherited gene mutations most often occurring from mothers to sons.

On the Pulse sat down with Bernier to learn more about these exciting findings. Read full post »

Meet Our New CEO, Dr. Jeff Sperring

Seattle Children's new CEO, Dr. Jeff Sperring

Seattle Children’s new CEO, Dr. Jeff Sperring

This week, the next chapter of Seattle Children’s journey begins with the arrival of our new CEO, Dr. Jeff Sperring. Even though it’s his first week on the job, he is no stranger to leading a world-class pediatric hospital. Sperring most recently served as president and CEO of Riley Hospital for Children at Indiana University Health, one of the largest children’s hospitals in the U.S. He was at Riley since 2002 and also served as Riley’s chief medical officer, associate chief medical officer and director of pediatric hospital medicine.

Sperring earned his medical degree from Vanderbilt University School of Medicine and was a pediatric resident at the Naval Medical Center San Diego. After residency, he served as a United States Navy Medical Corps officer in Twentynine Palms, Calif., for three years. Read full post »

Abnormal Genes Could Indicate Susceptibility for Kawasaki Disease, New Study Suggests

Dr. Michael Portman

Dr. Michael Portman

Abnormal genes found in Kawasaki disease patients could pave the way for early detection and treatment of not only Kawasaki disease but also many other inflammatory diseases such as psoriasis and multiple sclerosis (MS), according to a study recently published in the International Journal of Immunogenetics.

The study, titled “Imputation of class I and II HLA loci using high-density SNPs from ImmunoChip and their associations with Kawasaki disease in family-based study,” looked at blood and saliva DNA samples provided by 112 Kawasaki disease patients and their biological parents. The goal of the study was to identify possible genetic mutations, said author Dr. Michael Portman, a Seattle Children’s Hospital cardiologist and member of the Center for Developmental Therapeutics at Seattle Children’s Research Institute. Read full post »

Seattle Children’s Researchers to Present at Pediatric Academic Societies Annual Meeting

Dr. Megan Moreno (top) and Dr. Annika Hofstetter (bottom)

Dr. Megan Moreno (top) and Dr. Annika Hofstetter (bottom)

Seattle Children’s has the honor of having over 100 doctors and researchers slated to present at the 2015 Pediatric Academic Societies (PAS) Annual Meeting. This is the largest international meeting focused on children’s health research and clinical implications.

On the Pulse is highlighting two Seattle Children’s researchers who will be presenting their exciting new research: Dr. Megan Moreno and Dr. Annika Hofstetter.

Using media to understand mechanisms of behavior change

Dr. Megan Moreno of Seattle Children’s Center for Child Health and Behavioral Development is leading the way in adolescent social media (SM) use research. In her PAS presentation she will highlight key adolescent health issues pertaining to the SM landscape.

Over 90 percent of adolescents use SM, where they may display risky behaviors and describe their health attitudes, intentions and behaviors in ways that can be measured, Moreno said. Read full post »